Henry VI

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 2001 - History - 432 pages
In this widely acclaimed biography, Bertram Wolffe challenges the traditional view of Henry VI as an unworldly, innocent, and saintly monarch and offers instead a finely drawn but critical portrait of an ineffectual ruler. Drawing on widespread contemporary evidence, Wolffe describes the failures of Henry’s long reign from 1422 to 1471, which included the collapse of justice, the loss of the French territories, and the final disintegration of his government. He argues that the posthumous cult of Henry was promoted by Henry VII as a way of excusing his uncle’s political failures while enhancing the image of the dynasty. This edition includes a new foreword by John Watts that discusses the book and its place in the evolving literature.
Reviews of the earlier edition:
“A brilliant biography that brings us as near as we are ever likely to come to this elusive personality.”—Sunday Times (London)
“A powerful, compulsively readable portrait.”—Observer
“Much learning, skillfully deployed as here, evokes pleasure as well as admiration.”—R.L. Storey, Times Literary Supplement
 

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Contents

The Myth of the Royal Saint
3
An Infant King
25
Coronations
48
Royal Adolescence
65
The Attainment of Power
87
The Royal Entourage
93
Patronage Faction and Injustice in England 1437145o
106
The Founder of Eton and Kings
135
Surrender and Defeat 1445145o
184
Parliamentary Opposition and Popular Risings 1449145o
215
r3 The Frustration of Richard duke of York 145o1453
239
Madness 14531455
267
The First Battle of St Albans and its Consequences
289
The Loss of the Throne
313
The Last Ten Years
333
Apotheosis
351

the Problems of Normandy and Gascony
146
1o Marriage and Truce 14431445
169
Itinerary of Henry VI 14361461
361
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