Meanwhile Take My Hand

Front Cover
Graywolf Press, Jan 9, 2007 - Poetry - 200 pages
4 Reviews
The American debut of Basque writer Kirmen Uribe's "simple, devastating poems" (Bob Holman)
Whenever we're saddened everything looks dark,
When we're heartened, again, the world crumbles.
Every one of us keeps forever someone else's hidden side,
If it's a secret, if a mistake, if a gesture.

                                                             --from "May" Kirmen Uribe has become one of the best-known Basque-language writers--an important contemporary voice from a vital but largely unknown language. Meanwhile Take My Hand presents Uribe's poetry to American readers in both the original and in the poet Elizabeth Macklin's skillful and award-winning translations.
In these poems are the drug addicts of Spanish fishing towns, the paved-over rivers of urbanized medieval cities, the remains of loving relationships, whether entirely uprooted or making do with a companionable silence. The Basque phrase Bitartean heldu eskutik, which became the book's title--Meanwhile Take My Hand--Uribe has said is "what you say when there's nothing at all you can say."

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Meanwhile Take My Hand

User Review  - Annya - Goodreads

Great book, the first poetry book that I read by my own (not doing for homework or something), and I really enjoyed it. I would have preferred, though to read it in Basque. Read full review

Review: Meanwhile Take My Hand

User Review  - Goodreads

Great book, the first poetry book that I read by my own (not doing for homework or something), and I really enjoyed it. I would have preferred, though to read it in Basque. Read full review

Contents

Ibaia
4
Bisita
10
Loren
16
Maite zaitut ez
26
Gerraostea
32
Gereziondoa
38
The Cherry Tree
39
Zuhaitzen denbora
52
Bad Dream
65
Historical Memory
69
Ezin esan
82
The ArestiDuchamp Chess Game
95
Ez eman hautatzeko
108
Copyright

About the author (2007)

Kirmen Uribe was born in Ondarroa, Spain, in 1970. His debut poetry collection won Spain’s 2001 Premio de la Critica.
Elizabeth Macklin’s translations of Uribe have appeared in The New Yorker, and in 2005 she won a PEN Translation Fund grant.

Bibliographic information