Fathers and Children

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W.W. Norton, 2009 - Fiction - 418 pages
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Michael R. Katz presents Turgenev's greatest and ultimately most important novel in an acclaimed new translation of Fathers and Children. Katz's translation captures a world on the brink of change, subtle psychological confrontations among powerful fictional characters, and the gracefulness of Turgenev's poetic imagination. This new version of "Fathers and Children" will be welcomed by general readers and scholars alike. The novel is accompanied by a rich selection of Turgenev's letters, illustrating his involvement in the critical storm that surrounded its publication in 1862. Significant critiques of the day further enhance the reader's understanding of this public controversy. Critical essays are organized around several themes: the issue of translation; politics, including Turgenev's liberalism, view of revolution, and attitude toward nihilism; and various literary aspects, including Turgenev's use of imagery, the role of women, the conflict of generations, and the impact of science. A Chronology and Selected Bibliography are included. About the Series: No other series of classic texts equals the caliber of the Norton Critical Editions. Each volume combines the most authoritative text available with the comprehensive pedagogical apparatus necessary to appreciate the work fully. Careful editing, first-rate translation, and thorough explanatory annotations allow each text to meet the highest literary standards while remaining accessible to students. Each edition is printed on acid-free paper and every text in the series remains in print. Norton Critical Editions are the choice for excellence in scholarship for students at more than 2,000 universities worldwide.

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About the author (2009)

Ivan Turgenev, 1818 - 1883 Novelist, poet and playwright, Ivan Turgenev, was born to a wealthy family in Oryol in the Ukraine region of Russia. He attended St. Petersburg University (1834-37) and Berlin University (1838-41), completing his master's exam at St. Petersburg. His career at the Russian Civil Service began in 1841. He worded for the Ministry of Interior from 1843-1845. In the 1840's, Turgenev began writing poetry, criticism, and short stories under Nikolay Gogol's influence. "A Sportsman's Sketches" (1852) were short pieces written from the point of view of a nobleman who learns to appreciate the wisdom of the peasants who live on his family's estate. This brought him a month of detention and eighteen months of house arrest. From 1853-62, he wrote stories and novellas, which include the titles "Rudin" (1856), "Dvorianskoe Gnedo" (1859), "Nakanune" (1860) and "Ottsy I Deti" (1862). Turgenev left Russia, in 1856, because of the hostile reaction to his work titled "Fathers and Sons" (1862). Turgenev finally settled in Paris. He became a corresponding member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences in 1860 and Doctor of Civil Law at Oxford University in 1879. His last published work, "Poems in Prose," was a collection of meditations and anecdotes. On September 3, 1883, Turgenev died in Bougival, near Paris.

Michael R. Katz was born in New York and educated at Williams College and the University of Oxford. He taught Russian language and literature at Williams College, the University of Texas at Austin, and Middlebury College, where he is the C. V. Starr Professor Emeritus of Russian and East European Studies. He is the author of two monographs--The Literary Ballad in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature and Dreams and the Unconscious in Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction--and the translator of over fifteen Russian novels into English, including worksnbsp; bynbsp; Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. He lives in Cornwall, Vermont.

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