Art Principles in Portrait Photography: Composition, Treatment of Backgrounds, and the Processes Involved in Manipulating the Plate

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Arno Press, 1907 - Photography - 244 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
15
III
23
IV
40
V
60
VI
70
VII
98
VIII
121
IX
144
X
160
XI
168
XII
171
XIII
184
XIV
188
XV
207
XVI
229

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Page 18 - By applying these principles, growth comes, insuring insight into more complex methods of" reasoning and bringing the power to execute difficult problems. In art we are dealing strictly with the mental and emotional faculties more or less developed in each individual. These faculties respond when, on a flat surface, such as paper, we find certain emotional and intellectual records of things we have seen or experienced in nature. And it is the manner in which these records are made that affects us...
Page iii - ART PRINCIPLES IN PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY. Composition ; Treatment of Backgrounds, and the Processes involved in Manipulating the Plate. By OTTO WALTER BECK.
Page 11 - ... expression" have rarely been reached. Certain other factors are required to produce them. If creative work is to enter into photography, it must be possible to make on the negative a line of any character and to control the light and shade with the facility of one who paints. The illustrations of this book show that those powerful resources of the graphic arts, light lines and dark lines, lines having sharpness and lines having soft margins, can be made on the negative as readily as on paper...
Page 12 - ... the likeness may be raised into portraiture through a completeness of pictorial expression. The photographer's sole reliance upon "lighting" accounts for the peculiar and fatal limitations of plain photography. Lighting exists to give roundness to the forms of head and body. In painting we speak of it as "modelling.
Page 15 - Art is arrangement.' We may add that its study is not a matter of asking for recipes from this or that school, this or that national or racial art, this or that period, classical, renaissance, or modern. On the contrary, it is the acquiring of certain simple principles that underlie all art of all times. By applying these principles, growth comes, insuring insight into more complex methods of reasoning and bringing the power to execute difficult problems. In art we are dealing strictly with the mental...
Page 15 - Photography enters the field of art guided by the pictorial principle. Photo-portraiture should strive to attain the depths, the tactile quality, the logic and the completeness of balance that delight us in masterpieces of drawing or painting in monochrome. Compared with the free art of painting, photography will always have limitations, one of which is to be found in the temperamental differences of the workers in each profession.
Page 11 - In the treatise before us, Mr. Beck has shown, by description and pictorial illustration, that if creative work is to enter into photography it must be possible to make on the negative a line of any character and to control the light and shade with the facility of one who paints. In fact, his illustrations show that those powerful resources of the graphic arts, light lines and dark lines, can be made on the negative as readily as on paper and canvas.
Page 11 - ... of art. Art in photography is possible only in an extension of the methods known and in the employment of new processes to effect a manipulation of the photo-image. When the tool is made so pliable that it records more than the surface appearance of things, when the per10 sonal element enters to give life to the accurate records, the present limitations of impersonal representation are removed from photography, and its large true sphere of influence opens.
Page 21 - He will discover 20 that certain rules will help him on his way, but that every rule is expansive and wonderfully adaptable to his personality, his needs and his ideas.
Page 19 - Nature in itself has nothing to do with art; it is only the quarry, the reservoir out of which material for art can be taken.

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