The Pleasure and Pain of Cult Horror Films: An Historical Survey

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McFarland, Jun 8, 2009 - Performing Arts - 248 pages
The horror genre harbors a number of films too bold or bizarre to succeed with mainstream audiences, but offering unique, startling and often groundbreaking qualities that have won them an enduring following. Beginning with Victor Sjöström’s The Phantom Carriage in 1921, this book tracks the evolution and influence of underground cult horror over the ensuing decades, closing with William Winckler’s Frankenstein vs. the Creature from Blood Cove in 2005. It discusses the features that define a cult film, trends and recurring symbols, and changing iconography within the genre through insightful analysis of 88 movies. Included are works by popular directors who got their start with cult horror films, including Oliver Stone, David Cronenberg and Peter Jackson.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Root of All Horror
5
Monsters and Madmen
41
To Scare the World
79
The Nasty Eighties
157
The New Weirdness
189
Bibliography
219
Index
221
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Bartłomiej Paszylk is the author of the Polish–language horror film history Leksykon filmowego horroru. His articles, reviews and interviews have been published in popular magazines and websites in both Poland and the United States. He is the editor of the magazine Czachopismo.

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