Slight reminiscences of the Rhine, Switzerland, and a corner of Italy [by M. Boddington].

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1834
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Page 8 - A maiden never bold ; Of spirit so still and quiet, that her motion Blush'd at herself...
Page 51 - ... least heavily laden of the file ; of peasant girls (very fine creatures sometimes), with natural flowers placed carelessly in the hair, and a dash of powder occasionally thrown in with them ; and nearer to the town, plying carriages with three windows at each side, full of gay girls fanning themselves violently in their charming white veils, which make even the plain look pretty, and swarthy men less smartly dressed than their brisk companions ; boys playing at mora, soldiers looking on, and...
Page 68 - Elle citait encore cette phrase : « Les orangers du royaume « de Grenade, et les citronniers des rois maures, » comme produisant sur elle un grand effet. C'est ainsi que les plaisirs de la littérature et même ceux du monde...
Page 125 - One comes amongst them, seeking under every little hat for the charming face ; and peering at every tinselled jacket for the light shape, which St Preux, even while the fair form of the impassioned Julia floated before his mind's eye, found so perplexingly lovely, and a squalid halfawake race, disfigured by goitres which they show off as our women do white teeth or ivory fingers, presents itself. I should think the most fire-and-tow garde-du-corps in the service of his majesty Charles Dix, might...
Page 43 - Parmasan cheese, aquavits, rosolio, and vino d'ogni qualita ; and, jammed in between every five or six of high pretensions, the little indispensable one, where pease, flour, and grain of various kinds, heaped on plates, or piled up in wooden bowls, are retailed to the humble purchaser. But here too is a piazza painted...
Page 53 - Hotel des Quatre Nations, we were told that we could not get up to it in a carriage. We unpacked ourselves grumblingly, in the middle of a lane, as full of mire and oranges as Lower Thames Street ; and after dabbling through one or two passages of most forbidding aspect, reached the hotel. The first peep was highly characteristic. A saloon of handsome dimensions, with gilding and mirrors, hangings of light-blue satin damask, and a brick floor encrusted with dirt, looking down upon a sort of terrace...
Page 138 - ... developement of the passions. Man's nature is intricate, and must be studied intensely. He who would lay open the magnificent structure of the human mind, must watch it through the changeful phases of active life, and meditate what he has there marked, in the stillness of solitude, with the door barred upon the world and its distractions. But nature is more communicative than man ; she spreads open her page, and he who will may read its ample characters, and catch light and inspiration from them....
Page 140 - ... lieux. Je ne reverrai plus ces beaux paysages, ces forets, ces lacs, ces bosquets, ces rochers, ces montagnes dont l'aspect a toujours touché mon cœur : mais maintenant que je ne peux plus courir ces heureuses contrées je n'ai qu'à ouvrir mon herbier et bientôt il m'y transporte.
Page 83 - I love the Italian churches, with their broad aisles, vast and unfrittered, — no pews, no divisions, no aristocratical screenings; all kneeling together, the high and mighty and the lowly, on the same pavement; all sending up their thanksgiving, or their prayer, to the same great being in whose eyes all are equal. No dread of vulgar contact, no elbowing of the tattered penitent. I shall never forget the impression made upon me, on my first visit to St. Peter's at Rome, by a young lady who came...
Page 53 - Beyond this terrace a narrow rampart, with idle sailors in the red cap of the Levant, and jackets of all shades, from chocolate to saffron, lounging as sailors always lounge, from Blackwall to the Mola at Naples, with their hands stuck in their sides and their backs against the parapet, looking out for spots in the horizon.

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