The Georgics

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Penguin, 1982 - Poetry - 160 pages
3 Reviews
A eulogy to Italy as the temperate land of perpetual spring, and a celebration of the values of rustic piety, The Georgics is probably the supreme achievement of Latin poetry.
 

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User Review  - meandmybooks - LibraryThing

I knew going in that this wasn't going to be action packed, like, say, The Aeneid, and it isn't. Actually, that's not quite true. In some places there is plenty of action – where the plague is setting ... Read full review

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User Review  - Snukes - LibraryThing

This was the hardest book to read. I don't know why it was worse than any of the other classics, but it about killed me. Even illustrating the margins didn't help. Good luck Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Preface
7
Select Bibliography
9
General Introduction
11
LITERARY BACKGROUND OF THE CEORGICS
16
POLITICAL CLIMATE
20
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY
27
AGRICULTURAL LORE
31
THE POEM
32
Note on the Translation
55
Book i
57
Introduction to Book 2
74
Book 2
77
Introduction to Book 3
95
Book 3
99
Introduction to Book 4
119
Notes
144

DOWN THE AGES
46
Introduction to Book l
51

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About the author (1982)

Virgil, born in 70 B.C., is best remembered for his masterpiece, The Aeneid. He earned great favor by portraying Augustus as a descendant of the half-god, half-man Aeneas. Although Virgil swore on his deathbed that The Aeneid was incomplete and unworthy, it has been considered one of the greatest works of Western literature for more than two thousand years.
Betty Radice read classics at Oxford, then married and, in the intervals of bringing up a family, tutored in classics, philosophy and English. She became joint editor of the Penguin Classics in 1964. As well as editing the translation of Livy's The War with Hannibal she translated Livy's Rome and Italy, Pliny's Letters, The Letters of Abelard and Heloise and Erasmus's Praise of Folly, and also wrote the introduction to Horace's Complete Odes and Epodes, all for the Penguin Classics. She also edited Edward Gibbon's Memoirs of My Life for the Penguin English Library, and edited and annotated her translation of the younger Pliny's works for the Loeb Library of Classics and translated from Renaissance Latin, Greek and Italian for the Officina Bodoni of Verona. She collaborated as a translator in the Collected Works of Erasmus, and was the author of the Penguin Reference Book Who's Who in the Ancient World. Betty Radice was an honorary fellow of St Hilda's College, Oxford, and a vice-president of the Classical Association. Betty Radice died in 1985.

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