The Autobiography of Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury

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J. C. Nimmo, 1886 - Ambassadors - 369 pages
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Page 247 - Veritate; if it be for Thy glory, I beseech Thee give me some sign from heaven ; if not, I shall suppress it.
Page 313 - ... and so much under her own eye, as to see and converse with him daily; but she managed this power over him without any such rigid sourness as might make her company a torment to her child ; but with such a sweetness and compliance with the recreations and pleasures of youth as did incline him willingly to spend much of his time in the company of his dear and careful mother ; which was to her great content...
Page 63 - Certainly in taking revenge, a man is but even with his enemy ; but in passing it over, he is superior: for it is a prince's part to pardon. And Solomon, I am sure, saith, It is the glory of a man to pass by an offence.
Page 246 - Veritate, in my hand, and, kneeling on my knees, devoutly said these words : " O thou eternal God, author of the light which now shines upon me, and giver of all inward illuminations, I do beseech thee, of thy...
Page xi - Most people dislike vanity in others, whatever share they have of it themselves ; but I give it fair quarter wherever I meet with it, being persuaded that it is often productive of good to the possessor, and to others...
Page 92 - Passing two or three days here, it happened one evening, that a daughter of the Duchess, of about ten or eleven years of age, going one evening from the castle to walk in the meadows, myself, with divers French gentlemen, attended her and some gentlewomen that were with her. This young lady wearing a knot of ribband on her head, a French chevalier took it suddenly, and fastened it to his hatband. The young lady, offended herewith, demands her...
Page 93 - French cavalier, checked him well for his sauciness, in taking the ribbon away from his grandchild, and afterwards bid him depart his house ; and this was all that I ever heard of the gentleman, with whom I proceeded in that manner, because I thought myself obliged thereunto by the oath taken when I was made Knight of the Bath, as I formerly related upon this occasion.

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