The Indians' New World: Catawbas and Their Neighbors from European Contact Through the Era of Removal

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Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Va., 1989 - History - 381 pages
2 Reviews
This book is an eloquent account of the native peoples of the Carolina piedmont who became known as the Catawba Nation. James Merrell brings the Catawbas more fully into American history by tracing how they underwent that most fundamental of American expe

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mdobe - LibraryThing

James Merrell "The Indians' New World: The Catawba Experience" WMQ 41:4 (October 1984), 537-65. This article, published 2 years after the author's dissertation in 1982, captures the essentials of book ... Read full review

Review: The Indians' New World: Catawbas and Their Neighbors from European Contact Through the Era of Removal

User Review  - Ben - Goodreads

Read this book for my Native American History class. It was a relatively easy read and had numerous primary sources that added greatly to the validity of the points made in the study. Read full review

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About the author (1989)

James H. Merrell is Professor of History at Vassar College. His book, The Indians' New World: Catawbas and Their Neighbors from European Contact Through the Era of Removal (1989), won the Bancroft Prize, the Merle Curti Award, and the Frederick Jackson Turner Award. His most recent book is Into the American Woods: Negotiators on the Pennsylvania Frontier (1999).

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