Visual Language for Designers: Principles for Creating Graphics that People Understand

Front Cover
Rockport Publishers, Jun 1, 2009 - Design - 240 pages
2 Reviews

Within every picture is a hidden language that conveys a message, whether it is intended or not. This language is based on the ways people perceive and process visual information. By understanding visual language as the interface between a graphic and a viewer, designers and illustrators can learn to inform with accuracy and power.

In a time of unprecedented competition for audience attention and with an increasing demand for complex graphics, Visual Language for Designers explains how to achieve quick and effective communications. This book presents ways to design for the strengths of our innate mental capacities and to compensate for our cognitive limitations.

Visual Language for Designers includes:

—How to organize graphics for quick perception

—How to direct the eyes to essential information

—How to use visual shorthand for efficient communication

—How to make abstract ideas concrete

—How to best express visual complexity

—How to charge a graphic with energy and emotion

 

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Visual Language for Designers: Principles for Creating Graphics that People Understand

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

E-learning, visual communication, and design consultant Malamed sums up the crux of her book: "poor design is a major reason why information is misinterpreted," and all of the graphic imagery and text ... Read full review

Review: Visual Language for Designers: Principles for Creating Graphics that People Understand

User Review  - Goodreads

Important book for learning about how people understand graphics. Lots of varied examples, nicely designed and well-written. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
9
GETTING GRAPHICS
19
PRINCIPLES
43
Bibliography
228
Glossary of Terms
229
Sources Cited
230
Directory of Contributors
235

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Connie Malamed has a background in art and cognitive psychology, with a B.S. in Art Education and an M.A. in Instructional Design and Technology. She is a consultant based in the Washington, D.C. area in the fields of e-learning, visual communication, media design, and information design. http://www.malamedconsulting.com

Bibliographic information