Publication, Issue 1

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1920 - Sea-power
 

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Page 128 - On the day subsequent to this disaster six contact mines were located by the naval forces in the vicinity of the position where the disaster of the USS San Diego occurred. As a result of this disaster six enlisted men were injured and six lives lost. The six men lost in the sinking of the San Diego were Clyde Chester...
Page 128 - That at the time of the disaster and thereafter the conduct of the captain, officers, and crew was in the highest degree commendable, and that the remarkably small loss of life was due to the high state of discipline maintained on board...
Page 128 - The captain was steering a safe and proper course at the time to minimize the submarine and mine dangers in those waters. A careful inspection watch had been maintained while last coaling ship to prevent the introduction of any foreign matter in the coal bunkers. All lookouts, gun watches, fire-control parties, etc., as prescribed by the ' Orders for ships in convoy ' of the commander cruiser and transport force, were at their stations and on the alert.
Page 128 - ... vicinity of bulkhead No. 78, at the level of the port engine room; and bulkhead No. 78 was so deformed that water-tight door No. 142, between the port-engine room and No. 8 fireroom, was opened to the ingress of water to No. 8 fireroom. The effect of this rupture was to immediately fill the port-engine room and adjacent compartments, and No. 8 fireroom was soon filled also. The effect of this water would give the ship a list of 17J to port.
Page 128 - July 19, 1918, an explosion took place in proximity of the skin of the ship, at about frame No. 78, on the port side and well below the water-line. As a result of this explosion the ship began to list to port, and she finally rolled over and sank bottom up at about 11.25 am July 19, 1918. " The explosion was an exterior one, and as a result of this explosion the skin of the ship was ruptured in the vicinity of bulkhead No. 78, at the level of the port engine room, and bulkhead No. 78 was so deformed...
Page 16 - From experience of our own coasts the favourite spot for laying mines is the position in which Merchant Ships stop to pick up pilots for instance for Delaware bay pilots for large ships are picked up south of the five fathom bank light vessel. This is considered one of the most likely spots where submarine will lay mines. Germans have information that there is a patrol off most harbours and especially Chesapeake Bay where a neutral has reported that the patrol extends as far as Cape Skerry. It is...
Page 128 - The court in its report reviews the main points in the testimony as follows: " The USS San Diego, under the command of Capt. HH Christy, US Navy, was making passage from Portsmouth, NH, to New York, NY, and at or about 11.05 am, July 19, 1918, she was in approximate latitude 40 degrees 30 minutes north, longitude 73 degrees west, on base course 304 true, and zigzagging by an approved plan, speed 15 knots.
Page 16-6 - ... the officers and crew. At the after end of this compartment, and communicating with it, is the conning tower. Compartment No. 4 is given up entirely to cargo. Compartment No. 5 contains the propelling machinery, consisting of two heavy oil engines and two electric motors. The storage batteries are carried in the bottom of the boat, below the living compartment. For purposes of communication, a gangway, 2 feet 6 inches wide by 6 feet high, is built through each cargo compartment, thus rendering...
Page 128 - of the commander cruiser and transport force, were at their stations and on the alert. All reasonable and necessary orders to safeguard the water-tight integrity of the ship in dangerous waters had been given and were being carried out. "At or about 11.05 am, July 19, 1918, an explosion took place in proximity of the skin of the ship, at about frame No. 78, on the port side and well below the water-line. As a result of this explosion the ship began to list to port, and she finally rolled over and...
Page 128 - Capt. Dodge, hove in sight later and rescued the men in the water and transported them to New York. The court states the captains of these steamers showed courage and a splendid spirit in taking their ships into these waters, where a submarine had apparently been operating, and deserve commendation for their actions and it is recommended that suitable acknowledgment be made by the Navy Department of their gallantry.

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