A Dissertation on the Soil & Agriculture of the British Settlement of Penang, Or Prince of Wales Island, in the Straits of Malacca: Including Province Wellesley on the Malayan Peninsula. With Brief References to the Settlements of Singapore & Malacca..

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Printed at the Singapore free Press office, 1836 - Agriculture - 321 pages
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Page 40 - In a very good soil a pepper vine will yield about one-eighth of a pound of a dry produce at the end of the first year ; at the end of the second...
Page 300 - Had Jacquemont published his travels, much offensive matter would no doubt have been left out — and then the letters would have been doubly valuable. They will serve a good purpose even in their present shape, by dispelling much of the mist of prejudice and ignorance which floated betwixt the eyes of the people of Europe and British India. But the writer's would-be friends have injured his memory and perhaps future French travellers, by making him a betrayer of hospitality. these temples occasionally...
Page 63 - Gambir shrub is propagated either by seeds or cuttings, but the latter are preferred. It was formerly cultivated to some extent at Singapore, (where I had an opportunity of observing it in November 1830,) but the cultivation of the shrub and preparation of the extract is now neglected ; the reason assigned for which was, that the Gambir can be imported cheaper from the islands in the vicinity, more especially at the Dutch settlement at...
Page 30 - Why do those cliffs of shadowy tint appear More sweet than all the landscape smiling near ?Tis distance lends enchantment to the view, And robes the mountain in its azure hue.
Page 29 - ... feet from each other, screening them from the heat of the sun and violence of the winds. It is a matter of essential importance that the ground be well opened and its cohesion broken, in order to admit of the free expansion of the roots of the tender plants, and that it be intimately mixed with earth and cow manure, in the proportion of two-thirds of the former to one-third of the latter.
Page 64 - ... bazar. The method employed in preparing the extract is thus correctly related by FINLAYSON : " the leaves are collected three or four times a year ; they are thrown into a large cauldron, the bottom of which is formed of iron, the upper part of bark, and boiled for. five or six hours, until a strong decoction is obtained; the leaves are then withdrawn, and allowed to strain over the vessel, which is kept boiling for as many hours more, until the decoction is inspissated ; it is then allowed to...
Page 30 - ... in the red mould of these districts, it is more partial to a less tenacious soil. Its cultivation has been established for many years in the West Indies and at Bourbon, and is of secondary importance only. The mother cloves are planted in rich mould, at the distance of twelve inches from each other, screened from the sun and duly watered.
Page 62 - Rubiacese; it is a shrub, attaining the height of six to eight feet, branchy; the leaves are ovate, pointed, smooth, waving, distinctly veined transversely, underneath of dark green colour, and when chewed, they have a bitter astringent taste, leaving, however, afterwards, a sweetish taste in the mouth, not unlike liquorice: the flowers are aggregate, globular, composed of numerous florets, crowded on a globular, naked receptacle; tubes of the corolla of a pinkish colour; the upper part of the corolla...
Page 282 - Booddha,] that he is wholly unprejudiced against either party and uninfluenced by any consideration, whether pe. cuniary or otherwise; and he continues: " if what I have spoken shall prove to be false ; or if, by colouring the truth, others shall be led astray ; then may the three holy existences, viz. Buddha, and D,hamma...
Page 43 - The plants are then to be set out at intervals of 30 or 40 feet, — the latter, if ground can be spared, — -and the depth will be regulated by the nature of the soil, and the nut must not be covered with earth. The plants require, in exposed situations, to be shaded for one or even two years, and no lalang grass must be permitted, to encroach on their roots. A nursery must be always held in readiness to supply the numerous vacancies which will occur from deaths and accidents. The following may...

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