Chemistry for Engineering Students

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Cengage Learning, Dec 6, 2005 - Science - 656 pages
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This text provides engineering majors with a concise yet thorough introduction to the science of chemistry. It gives them a firm foundation in the principles of structure and bonding, the basis for many topics in various engineering fields. The authors include relevant topic coverage as well as applications and problems that are specific to engineering. Particular emphasis is given to showing the connection between molecular properties and observable physical properties, and the connections between chemistry and other subjects studied by engineering students, including mathematics and physics.
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Contents

Introduction to Chemistry
1
Atoms and Molecules
37
Molecules Moles and Chemical Equations
78
Stoichiometry
122
Gases
155
The Periodic Table and Atomic Structure
196
Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure
247
Molecules and Materials
295
Physical Constants
579
Electron Configurations of Atoms in the Ground State
580
Specific Heats and Heat Capacities of Some Common Substances
581
Selected Thermodynamic Data at 29815 K
582
Ionization Constants of Weak Acids at 25C
589
Ionization Constants of Weak Bases at 25C
591
Solubility Product Constants of Some Inorganic Compounds at 25C
592
Standard Reduction Potentials in Aqueous Solution at 25C
594

Energy and Chemistry
343
Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics
388
Chemical Kinetics
423
Chemical Equilibrium
476
Electrochemistry
529
International Table of Atomic Weights
577
Answers to Check Your Understanding Exercises
598
Answers to OddNumbered EndofChapter Exercises
601
Glossary
623
Index
637
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Larry Brown (Ph.D, Princeton University) is a Senior Lecturer and coordinator for the general chemistry for engineers course at Texas A&M University. He received his B.S. in 1981 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his M. A. in 1983 from Princeton University. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow from 1986-88 at the University of Chicago. His research activities include active learning and use of technology in education and integration of chemistry with other subjects in the engineering curriculum. His current efforts are in (i) continued development of the CHEM 107 curriculum, (ii) improving uses of technology in chemical education, and (iii) incorporation of active learning strategies into large classroom settings. These efforts are brought together with the Foundation Coalition, an NSF-supported effort to implement a new model for the education of engineering students. Larry also monitors the CHEM 107 course for Texas A&M's campus in Qatar in the Middle East and has traveled there numerous times.

Tom Holme (Ph.D, Rice University) is a chemistry professor at Iowa State University and Director of the ACS Examinations Institute. He is active in both computational chemistry and chemical education research and has been involved with the general chemistry for engineers course at both Iowa State and the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee. Some of his recent publications include: "Designing Chemistry Practice Exams for Enhanced Benefits: An Instrument for Comparing Performance and Mental Effort Measures," (Karen Knaus, Kristen Murphy and Thomas Holme), Journal of Chemical Education, 2009, in press; "Nanoscience Items for Standardized Exams in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum" (Thomas Holme), in Nanoscale Science and Engineering Education: Issues, Trends and Future Directions, ed., A.E. Sweeny & S. Seal, American Scientific Publishers, Stevenson Ranch, CA, 2008; and "Assessing Problem-solving Strategies in Chemistry Using the IMMEX System" in Proceedings of the National STEM Assessment Conference, eds. D. Deeds & B. Callen, National Science Foundation, Washington, DC, 2008.

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