Evenings with the Skeptics: Or, Free Discussion on Free Thinkers, Volume 1

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1881 - Skepticism
 

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Page 207 - ... of truth, and lie bed-ridden in the dormitory of the soul, side by side with the most despised and exploded errors.
Page 249 - The man answered: You have only to walk about until your legs are heavy, and then to lie down, and the poison will act. At the same time he handed the cup to Socrates, who in the easiest and gentlest manner, without the least fear or change of...
Page 337 - Not as though I had already attained, either were already perfect : but I follow after, if that I may apprehend that, for which also I am apprehended of Christ Jesus.
Page 249 - What is this strange outcry? he said. I sent away the women mainly in order that they might not offend in this way, for I have heard that a man should die in peace. Be quiet then, and have patience.
Page 400 - Be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thine heart be hasty to utter any thing before God: for God is in heaven, and thou upon earth : therefore let thy words be few.
Page 431 - Five of these are of universal obligation — viz., not to kill; not to steal; not to commit adultery; not to lie; not to be drunken.
Page 249 - What do you say about making a libation out of this cup to any god? May I, or not ? The man answered: We only prepare, Socrates, just so much as we deem enough.
Page 248 - I and my sons will have received justice at your hands. The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our ways — I to die, and you to live. Which is better, God only knows.
Page 250 - Crito, I owe a cock to Asclepius; will you remember to pay the debt? The debt shall be paid, said Crito; is there anything else? There was no answer to this question; but in a minute or two a movement was heard, and the attendants uncovered him; his eyes were set, and Crito closed his eyes and mouth. Such was the end...
Page 249 - Then holding the cup to his lips, quite readily and cheerfully he drank off the poison. And hitherto most of us had been able to control our sorrow; but now when we saw him drinking, and saw too that he had finished the draught, we could no longer forbear, and in spite of myself my own tears were flowing fast; so that I covered my face and wept over myself, for certainly I was not weeping over him, but at the thought of my own calamity in having lost such a companion. Nor was I the first, for Crito,...

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