The Coinage of William Wood, 1722-1733

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W. C. Weight, 1903 - Coinage - 44 pages
 

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Page 16 - Advantages thereby granted to him, you give him all due Encouragement and Assistance, and that you and all such other of His Majesty's Officers there, whom it may concern, do readily perform all legal Acts, that may be requisite for that purpose. This I am particularly to recommend to your Care ; and to desire your Protection to Mr. Wood and to those he shall employ to transact this affair in the Provinces under your Government. " I am, Sir, " Your most humble Servant, " Holies Newcastle." " Governor...
Page 14 - Whereas I, Thomas Handy, of Meath Street, Dublin, did receive by the last packet, from a person in London, to whom I am an entire stranger, bills of lading for eleven casks of Wood's halfpence, shipped at Bristol, and consigned to me by the said person on his own proper account, of which I had not the least notice until I received the said bills of lading. " Now I, the said Thomas Handy, being highly sensible of the duty and regard which every honest man owes to his country and to his fellow-subjects,...
Page 13 - Justices, the Council, and the Grand Juries of the city and county of Dublin. Wood was at this period described " as guilty of most notorious fraud in his coinage," and foolishly allowed himself to be drawn into a very unwise reply, which appeared in The Flying Post, Oct.
Page 14 - ... highly sensible of the duty and regard which every honest man owes to his country and to his fellow-subjects, do hereby declare, that I will not be concerned, directly or indirectly, in entering, landing, importing, receiving, or uttering any of the said Wood's halfpence, for that I am fully convinced, as well from the addresses of both houses of Parliament, as otherwise, that the importing and uttering the said halfpence will be destructive to this nation, and prejudicial to his Majesty's revenue....
Page 16 - Sir His Majesty having been pleased to grant to Mr. William Wood his Letters Patents for the Coyning of Halfpence, Pence and Two Fences of the Value of Money of Great Britain for the Use of His...
Page 16 - Dominions, as you will see more at large by a Copy of the Patent, which will be laid before you by the person, that delivers this Letter to you; I am to signify to you His...
Page 16 - Majesty's dominions, as you will see more at large by the patent which will be laid before you by the person that delivers this letter to you, I am to signify to you His Majesty's pleasure that in pursuance of a clause in...
Page 24 - Obv. — Shield of Britain, crowned, within the collar and badge of the Order of the Thistle all within the Garter.
Page 16 - ... that in pursuance of a clause in said patent by which all His Majesty's officers are to be aiding and assisting Mr. Wood in the due execution of what is therein directed and in the legal exercise of the several powers and enjoyment of the privileges and advantages thereby graunted to him, you are to give him all due encouragement and assistance and that you and all such other of His Majesty's officers there, whom it may concern, do readily perform all legal acts that may be requisite for that...
Page 15 - Plantations," for a term of fourteen years. The amount to be coined was not to exceed 300 tons, of which 200 tons were to be coined in the first four years and not more than ten tons per annum during the last ten. For this right of coinage Wood was to pay an annual rent to the Crown of 100 and to the clerk comptroller 200. The material for the coinage of these American pieces was a mixture called Bath metal, the composition of which, in twenty ounces of metal, was as follows : — Silver .......

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