Biology and the Riddle of Life

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UNSW Press, 1999 - Science - 158 pages
Charles Birch considers fundamental questions about Life and the relationship between science and religion. Questions such as: What is Life? What does it mean to be alive? Is God necessary? Birch shows that viewing the world as a realm of experience rather than as a collection of objects allows one to come to a naturalistic understanding of God which is very different from traditional religious notions.
 

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Contents

RICHNESS OF EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN LIFE
21
IS LIFE REDUCIBLE TO PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY?
50
CUTTING HUMANS DOWN TO SIZE
66
ROMANCING NATURE
91
PROCESSING TOWARDS LIFE
109
IS GOD NECESSARY?
126
References
143
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About the author (1999)

Dr. Charles Birch has been an Emeritus Professor at the University of Sydney since 1983. In 1961 he was honored as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science and as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1980. He became a member of the Club of Rome in 1980 and is an Honorary Life Fellow of the British Ecological Society. He is also an Honorary Life Member of the Ecological Society of America. The Eminent Ecologist Award was presented to him in 1988 and he was awarded the Templeton Prize in 1990. Birch is a member of the Center for Process Studies, the American Center for a Post Modern World, and the World Council of Churches. Dr. Charles Birch has written nine books and sixty publications on science, religion, and human existence. He lives in Darling Point, New South Wales, Australia.

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