The History of Hernando de Soto and Florida: Or, Record of the Events of Fifty-six Years, from 1512-1568

Front Cover
Collins, printer, 1881 - America - 689 pages
A historical record of expeditions to Florida by Hernando de Soto and others from the years 1512-1568.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CHAPTER IX
163
CHAPTER X
182
HISTORY OF THE CONQUEST OF FLORIDA ? I
217
SPECIAL CONTENTS
231
CONTENTS
232
PART FIRST
237
Bounds of Florida
238
Those who have undertaken the Conquest of Florida
239
Religion and Customs of the People of Florida
241
Preparations for Florida
243
Embarkation for Florida
244
What happened to the Army from Sun Lucar to Cuba
245
Combat of two Ships
248
Arrival of De Soto at Cuba
250
Despair of some of the Inhabitants of Cuba
251
Vasco Porcallo de Figueroa joins the Army
252
Soto arrives at Havana 2
253
The Adventure of Ferdinand Ponce at Havana
254
WHAT HAPPENED IN THE DISCOVERY OF THE FIRST EIGHT PRO
257
The death of three Spaniards and the tortures which Juan Ortis suffered 2i9
259
The Escape of Ortis
261
The generosity of the Cacique MUCOQO
263
The General sends to demand Ortis
264
The Meeting of Ortis and Gallego
265
Mucoco visits the General
267
The Mother of MUCOC O comes to the Camp
268
Preparations to advance into the Country 2jiJ X Continuation of the Discovery
271
The Misfortune of Porcallo
272
The Report of Gallego
273
The Passage of the Swamp
274
Silvestre carries the orders of the General to Moscoso
276
The return of Silvestre
278
The Province of Acuera
279
WHAT HAPPENED BETWEEN THE SPANIARDS AND THE INDIANS
303
PART SECOND
370
THE ATTACE ON FORT ALIBAMO THE DEATH OF MANY SPANIARDS
401
BOOK THIRD
427
The Decision of the Troops after the death of their General
439
The Superstition of the Indians
440
The arrival of the Spaniards at Auche and the Death of their Guide
441
AVhat happened in the Province of Herdsmen
443
The Return of the Spaniards to the Chucagua and their Adventures
445
The Troops take possession of Aminoia
449
The Conduct of two Caciques to the Spaniards
450
The League of some Caciques
452
The Quarrel of Guachoia with the Lieutenant of Auilco 4
453
Concerning an Indian Spy
455
The Preparations of the Leagued Caciques and an overflow of the Chucagua
457
A Stratagem of the Indians and the rashness of a Spaniard
469
The Return of the Indians to their Country and the ar rival of the Spaniards at the Sea
471
The number of Leagues which the Spaniards travelled in Florida and a Fight with the Indians of the Coast 47J
472
The Voyage of the Spaniards and their Adventures 47
473
The Adventure of two Caravels
475
They send to seek the General and to Explore the Country
477
The Spaniards know that they are ia Mexico
479
The Arrival of the Spaniards at Panuco and their Dis sensions
480
The Arrival and Reception of the Spaniards at Mexico
482
Concerning some particulars of the Journey
483
The Spaniards disband
484
The Christians who have died in Florida
485
HERNANDO DE SOTO AND FLORIDA
491
CHAPTER III
510
CHAPTER IV
544
CHAPTER V
562
THE COUNTRY AND ANCIENT INDIAN TRIBES OF FLORIDA BY HER
584
APPENDIX oTI 1 The Spanish Government in America
593
Indian Bows
596
Indian Language of Signs
598
The Deserts of Sonora
599
Olancho Antique
600
TierraFirme and the Town of Panama
601
The Desert of Motupe
603
Viracocha and Huana Capac
605
Prescotts Opinion of Gareilasso
606
Enormous Canes
609
Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon
610
North American Indiansfrom the Earliest and most Authentic Accounts of Virginia
611
The Elvns Account of De Soto from the beginning of his Enterprise to his Arrival and Encampment in Florida
614
The Inhabitants of Florida their Towns and Houses
621
Buffaloes
624
Indian Temples and Funerals
626
Ancient Artificial Mounds etc
635
Pearls
638
An Account of the Muscogulge Indians
639
The Painted Vulture and Muscogulge Standard
651
Indian Forts
652
Alabama Indians
653
An Omission in Garcilassos Conquest of Florida
654
The Death and Burial of De Soto
660
Tontis Route to the Naoundiches
668
St Deniss Route to Mexico
672
Mississippi River
674
The Route of De Soto in Florida
676
A List of Indian Names first mentioned in the History of Florida
681
The First Attempt of Protestants to form a Religious Settlement in America
685

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 137 - To us it was a rare sight to be thrown in the midst of a large nation of what is termed wild Indians, surpassing many of the Christian nations in agriculture, little behind them in the useful arts, and immeasurably before them in honesty and virtue.
Page 77 - It is plentifully supplied with lakes and ponds of running water, and being in the latitude of 34. the air is salubrious, pure and temperate, and free from the extremes of both heat and cold. There are no violent winds in these regions, the most prevalent are the north-west and west. In summer, the season in which we were there, the sky is clear, with but little rain : if fogs and mists are at any time driven in by the south wind, they are instantaneously dissipated, and at once it becomes serene...
Page 81 - Their women are of the same form and beauty, very graceful, of fine countenances and pleasing appearance in manners and modesty ; they wear no clothing except a deer skin, ornamented like those worn by the men ; some wear very rich lynx skins upon their arms, and various ornaments upon their heads, composed of braids of hair, which also hang down upon their breasts on each side.
Page 80 - These vines would doubtless produce excellent wine if they were properly cultivated and attended to, as we have often seen the grapes which they produce very sweet and pleasant, and not unlike our own. They must be held in estimation by them, as they carefully remove the shrubbery from around them, wherever they grow, to allow the fruit to ripen better. We found also wild roses, violets, lilies, and many sorts of plants and fragrant flowers different from our own.
Page 81 - The young man was similar in his general appearance. This is the finest looking tribe, and the handsomest in their costumes, that we have found in our voyage. They exceed us in size, and they are of a very fair complexion ; some of them incline more to a white...
Page 77 - The whole shore is covered with fine sand, about fifteen feet thick, rising in the form of little hills about fifty paces broad. Ascending farther, we found several arms of the sea which make in through inlets, washing the shores on both sides as the coast runs. An outstretched country appears at a little distance, rising somewhat above the sandy shore in beautiful fields and broad plains, covered with immense forests of trees, more or less dense, too various in colors, and too delightful and charming...
Page 646 - But it may be proper to observe, that this mount, on which the rotunda stands, is of a much ancienter date than the building, and perhaps was raised for another purpose. The Cherokees themselves are as ignorant as we are, by what people or for what purpose these artificial hills were raised...
Page 85 - Adriatic gulf, near Illyria and Dalmatia. We had no intercourse with the people, but we judge that they were similar in nature and usages to those we were last among. After sailing between east and north the distance of one hundred and fifty leagues more, and finding our provisions and naval stores nearly exhausted, we took in wood and water and determined to return to France, having discovered 502, that is 700 (sic) leagues of unknown lands.
Page 80 - ... mouth, forced its way to the sea ; from the sea to the estuary of the river, any ship heavily laden might pass, with the help of the tide, which rises eight feet. But as we were riding at anchor in a good berth, we would not venture up in our vessel, without a knowledge of the mouth ; therefore...
Page 80 - ... in size about equal to the island of Rhodes, having many hills covered with trees, and well peopled, judging from the great number of fires which we saw all around its shores ; we gave it the name of your majesty's illustrious mother.

Bibliographic information