Americanization, Acculturation, and Ethnic Identity: The Nisei Generation in Hawaii

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University of Illinois Press, 1994 - History - 326 pages
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Eileen Tamura examines the forms that U.S. hysteria over 'Americanization' took after World War I in Hawaii, where the children of Japanese imigrants--the Nisei--were targets of widespread discrimination. She offers a wealth of original source material, using personal accounts and statistical data to create an essential resource for students of American ethnic history and U.S. race and class relations.
 

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Contents

The Hawaii Setting
1
Background
9
Settlers
22
The Americanization Campaign
45
Discrimination and Americanization
70
The schooling of the Nisei
91
Schools as Channels for Plantation Work
125
Japanese Language Schools
146
Cultural Changes
188
Occupational Changes
211
Epilogue
235
Firsts among Japanese Americans in Hawaii
241
Notes
245
Works Cited
293
Index
319
Copyright

Social Changes
165

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About the author (1994)

Eileen H. Tamura is a historian and professor of education at the College of Education, University of Hawaii. She is the author of "Americanization, Acculturation, and Ethnic Identity: The Nisei Generation in Hawaii" (1994). She co-authored "The Rise of Modern Japan" (2003),"" which won the Franklin Buchanan Award from the Association for Asian Studies, and co-authored "China: Understanding Its Past" (1998)," "which won the James Harvey Robinson Prize from the American Historical Association. Her articles have appeared in journals such as "History of Education Quarterly, Journal of American Ethnic History, Amerasia Journal, Pacific Historical Review, "and" The Journal of Negro Education."

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