A Trip to Newfoundland: Its Scenery and Fisheries; with an Account of the Laying of the Submarine Telegraph Cable

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T.W. Strong, 1855 - Cables, Submarine - 108 pages
 

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Page 36 - The town is fortified with an entrenchment, salient angles, and redoubts, which inclose about half a mile in length, and a quarter of a mile in width.
Page 96 - ... accordingly, it is a common custom, about eight or nine o'clock, to yard one's team, and turn them out with the first daylight for another three or four hours' feed. Yarding bullocks is, however, a bad plan. They do their day's work of from fifteen to twenty miles, or sometimes more, at one spell, and travel at the rate of from two and a half to three miles an hour. The road from Christ Church to Main's is metalled for about four and a half miles ; there are fences and fields on both sides, either...
Page 105 - In originating this enterprise, Mr. Tebbetts conceived the idea of the Newfoundland Telegraph, which is at present so prominently before the public. Confident of the practicability of the project, he entered into a correspondence with different members of the Government of Newfoundland in regard to the subject, and with the view of making St.
Page 105 - ... contracted with me to assume the management of a Newfoundland telegraph company, which I saw would advance my own project, namely, an Atlantic telegraph. On that occasion, the following facts were given me. They will be found in an historical account of the Newfoundland telegraph, published in 1*55 : — a company to build steamers of a large size, to run between the ports of New York and Galway, Ireland. These ships were to be adapted to perform the mail service, and to accommodate emigrant...
Page 47 - ... never produced a government which was more than formally responsible. Perhaps the psychological reason for the collapse of Newfoundland is to be found in a footnote. Writing in 1855, an American visitor observed that " The merchants are chiefly of English birth, and as the island has no attraction for them it is only tolerable on account of the means it affords of acquiring wealth whereby they are enabled to live in luxury and magnificence at home.
Page 105 - Soon after, the government ordered a survey to be made, and on its completion sent the engineer, Mr. Gisborne, with his report and a letter of introduction from Mr. SG Archibald, dated December 17, 1851, to Mr. Tebbetts. The introduction resulted in the offer of the sum of twenty thousand dollars by Mr. Tebbetts to the engineer, on condition that he would return and procure...
Page 106 - The success of this cable led to the abandonment of the p'an of running steamers between Cape North and Cape Ray, and to a change in the route of the line. It was decided that the line should run from New Brunswick to Prince Edward's Island, and thence to Newfoundland. The company ordered a submarine cable to be made, which was laid down in September, 1852, between New Brunswick and Prince Edward's Island, a distance of ten miles. "After expending about one hundred thousand dollars in the prosecution...
Page 105 - ... sum of twenty thousand dollars by Mr. Tebbetts to the engineer, on condition that he would return and procure a charter from the government. The offer was accepted, the engineer returned and succeeded in procuring the charter, which was granted in March, 1852, and under which Mr. Tebbetts organized the Newfoundland Electric Telegraph Company. " When Mr. Tebbetts first conceived the project, it was his design to run small steamers across the Gulf of St. Lawrence between Cape Ray and Cape North,...
Page 37 - Building is a square strnctnre of granite, two stories high. It contains the chambers of the two Legislative branches, the House of Assembly, and the Legislative Council. A short distance from this building stands the Governor's house, where the recently appointed Governor, Mr. Charles H. Darling, resides. On the evening of the Iflth a grand banquet was given on board the steamer to the public authorities of St.

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