The Black Tulip

Front Cover
Dent, 1960 - Fiction - 248 pages
The tulip craze of 17th century Holland has a dark side! Cornelius van Baerle, a wealthy but naAve tulip grower, finds himself entangled in the deadly politics of his time. Cornelius' one desire is to grow the perfect black tulip. But, after his godfather is murdered, he finds himself in prison, facing a death sentence. His jailer's lovely daughter holds the key to his survival, and his chance to produce the precious black blossom. Yet he has one more enemy to contend with!

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
10
4 stars
13
3 stars
10
2 stars
1
1 star
1

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jonfaith - LibraryThing

Consider me befuddled. William of Orange is depicted in The Black Tulip as an almost pantomime villain, although bereft of curling moustaches. Whereas Neal Stephenson characterizes Willie as a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mrsdanaalbasha - LibraryThing

The Black Tulip is a historical novel written by Alexandre Dumas, père. The story begins with a historical event — the 1672 lynching of the Dutch Grand Pensionary (roughly equivalent to a modern ... Read full review

Contents

CRAP J I A GRATEFUL PEOPLE I
3
THE TWO BROTHERS I I
11
THE PUPIL OF JOHN DE WITT
21
Copyright

30 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1960)

After an idle youth, Alexandre Dumas went to Paris and spent some years writing. A volume of short stories and some farces were his only productions until 1927, when his play Henri III (1829) became a success and made him famous. It was as a storyteller rather than a playwright, however, that Dumas gained enduring success. Perhaps the most broadly popular of French romantic novelists, Dumas published some 1,200 volumes during his lifetime. These were not all written by him, however, but were the works of a body of collaborators known as "Dumas & Co." Some of his best works were plagiarized. For example, The Three Musketeers (1844) was taken from the Memoirs of Artagnan by an eighteenth-century writer, and The Count of Monte Cristo (1845) from Penchet's A Diamond and a Vengeance. At the end of his life, drained of money and sapped by his work, Dumas left Paris and went to live at his son's villa, where he remained until his death.

Bibliographic information