Fairy legends and traditions of the south of Ireland [by T.C. Croker].

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - Indian mount, or fairy elves, Whose midnight revels by a forest side Or fountain some belated peasant sees, Or dreams he sees, while overhead the moon Sits arbitress, and nearer to the earth Wheels her pale course ; they, on their mirth and dance Intent, with jocund music charm his ear; At once with joy and fear his heart rebounds.
Page 154 - On Lough Neagh's bank as the fisherman strays, When the clear, cold eve's declining, He sees the round towers of other days, In the wave beneath him shining! Thus shall memory often, in dreams sublime, Catch a glimpse of the days that are over, Thus, sighing, look through the waves of time For the long-faded glories they cover!
Page 299 - OH, happy shades — to me unblest ! Friendly to peace, but not to me ! How ill the scene that offers rest, And heart that cannot rest, agree...
Page 93 - All thinking that the priest would have done so, as he ought if he had done his duty, no one wished to take the word out of his mouth, which unfortunately was preoccupied with pig's head and greens. And after a moment's pause, the fun and merriment of the bridal feast went on without the pious benediction. " Of this circumstance both Bill j and his master were no inattentive spectators from their exalted stations.
Page 90 - Away they went, through key-hole after key-hole ; and each mounting upon the rush which he...
Page 94 - Daniel — take that for your wages " — gave poor Billy a most furious kick in the back, which sent his unfortunate servant sprawling upon his face and hands right in the middle of the supper table. If Billy was astonished, how much more so was every one of the company into which he was thrown with so little ceremony ! but when they heard his story, father Cooney laid down his knife and fork, and married the young couple out of hand with all speed ; and Billy Mac Daniel danced the Rinka at their...
Page 143 - I'ma man to be pitied among you.' ' Whist, whist, you fool,' said he ; ' hold your tongue. I tell you Arabia is a very decent sort of place, as like West Carbery as one egg is like another, only there is a little more sand there.
Page 193 - The lord of Dunkerron — O'Sullivan More, Why seeks he at midnight the sea-beaten shore? His bark lies in haven, his hounds are asleep; No foes are abroad on the land or the deep. Yet nightly the lord of Dunkerron is known On the wild shore to watch and to wander alone; For a beautiful spirit of ocean, 't is said, The lord of Dunkerron would win to his bed.
Page 87 - Success," said the little man; " and you're heartily welcome, Billy ; but don't think to cheat me as you have done others, — out with your purse and pay me like a gentleman." " Is it I pay you ?" said Billy : " could I not just take you up and put you in my pocket as easily as a blackberry ?" " Billy Mac Daniel," said the little man, getting very angry, " you shall be my servant for seven years and a day, and that is the way I will be paid ; so make ready to follow me.
Page 18 - ... with instant resolve it was determined to bring the mortal among them, whose musical skill so far exceeded theirs, and little Lusmore was conveyed into their company with the eddying speed of a whirlwind. Glorious to behold was the sight that burst upon him as he came down through the moat, twirling round and round and round with the lightness of a straw, to the sweetest music that kept time to his motion.

Bibliographic information