Biological Sciences at the National Research Council of Canada: The Early Years to 1952

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Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press, Dec 24, 1979 - History - 153 pages
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This monograph describes the work of the Division of Biological Sciences of the National Research Council of Canada. Part One deals with scientific research in agriculture and other areas from 1916 until 1939. The subject of Part Two is the solution of special problems connected with World War II, including the preservation and packaging of food for long–distance transportation. Part Three records changes in emphasis following the war and establishment of branch laboratories in various parts of Canada.

Historians of science and students of Canadian history will find this a valuable reference work. Written in nontechnical language, it can be read easily by anyone interested in the development of biological sciences and in the work of the National Research Council.

 

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Contents

The Agricultural Background
3
The Division Is Born
10
Inaugural Researches
16
Trees
22
Food Preservation
28
Biowarfare
37
Camouflage
42
Canning Investigations
52
Rubber and Agar
59
Peace and Progress
67
Ottawa Regroupings
78
A Presentation before the First Meeting of the Special
91
Memorandum Proposing a Change of Name of the Division
97
Publications Related to Work Done in the Division During
109
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About the author (1979)

Norman T. Gridgeman, who holds the Ph.D. degree from the University of London, joined the National Research Council as a biomathematician in 1952 after working in England as a biochemist. He is the author of more than 100 articles on subjects ranging from the technology of taste–testing to the geometry of the Colosseum.

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