The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and General Information, Volume 5

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Hugh Chisholm
Encyclopaedia britannica Company, 1910 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries
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Page 184 - I called the New World into existence to redress the balance of the Old.
Page 131 - That, in order to give effect to the will of the people as expressed by their elected representatives, it is necessary that the power of the other House to alter or reject bills passed by this House should be so restricted by Law as to secure that within the limits of a single Parliament the final decision of the Commons shall prevail.
Page 279 - The envoy loses, his rights of inviolability if it is proved beyond doubt that he has taken advantage of his privileged position to provoke or commit an act of treachery.
Page 231 - ... courts, shall, in addition to any original jurisdiction exercised by the corresponding courts of the Colonies at the establishment of the Union, have jurisdiction in all matters: a) in which the Government of the Union or a person suing or being sued on behalf of such Government is a party ; b) in which the validity of any provincial ordinance shall come into question.
Page 129 - I am more angry with you than for all the rest. Your timidity, or fastidiousness, or some other knavish quality, will not let you give your conceptions glowing, and bold, and powerful, as they present themselves ; but you must chasten, and refine, and soften them, forsooth, till half their nature and grandeur is chiselled away from them.
Page 70 - My objects were, first, to prove that these reports were false and calumnious, and thus to vindicate my brethren, whose death was precious in the sight of the Lord ; and next, that as the same cruelties might very soon after be exercised against many unhappy individuals, foreign nations might be touched with at least some compassion towards them and solicitude about them.
Page 74 - But when these absurdities are discarded, I willingly admit any thing which helps to express the true and substantial communication of the body and blood of the Lord, as exhibited to believers under the sacred symbols of the Supper, understanding that they are received not by the imagination or intellect merely, but are enjoyed in reality as the food of eternal life.
Page 247 - And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shall be brought down to hell : for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.
Page 22 - By God, he that is weakest among you shall be in my sight the strongest, until I have vindicated for him his rights ; but him that is strongest will I treat as the weakest, until he complies with the law.
Page 101 - I say that the camel is by no means docile, very much the contrary ; he takes no heed of his rider, pays no attention whether he be on his back or not, walks straight on when once set a-going, merely because he is too stupid to turn aside ; and then, should some tempting thorn or green branch allure him out of the path, continues to walk on in this new direction simply because he is too dull to turn back into the right road.

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