Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Volume 15

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Taylor & Francis, 1867 - Electronic journals
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Page xvii - Sewalik fossils was prepared and presented by the Court of Directors of the East India Company to the principal museums in Europe. Under the patronage of the Government and of the East India House an illustrated work was also brought out, entitled
Page x - The design of the following treatise is to investigate the fundamental laws of those operations of the mind by which reasoning is performed...
Page 149 - When the spectroscope was placed on the telescope, the light of this new star formed a spectrum unlike that of any celestial body which we have hitherto examined. The light of the star is compound, and has emanated from two different sources. Each light forms its own spectrum. In the instrument these spectra appear superposed. The principal spectrum is analogous to that of the sun, and is evidently formed by the light of an incandescent solid or liquid photosphere, which has suffered absorption by...
Page 214 - The rosolic acid obtained from rosaniline is free, or almost free, from leuco-rosolic acid. Be this, however, as it may, there can be no doubt that rosaniline and carbolic acid give essentially the same product...
Page 138 - The Calculus of Chemical Operations ; ' being a method for the investigation, by means of symbols, of the laws of the distribution of weight in chemical change ; Part I., on the construction of chemical symbols, 'Phil.
Page 422 - ... 100° C. without sustaining any change. Actual immersion in water is not necessary for the most perfect preservation of gun-cotton ; the material, if only damp to the touch, sustains not the smallest change, even if closely packed in large quantities. The organic impurities which doubtless give rise to the very slight development of acid observed when gun-cotton is closely packed in the dry condition, appear...
Page 111 - As frequent mention is made of the different-sized machines employed in these investigations, they are distinguished by the calibre, or bore of the magnet-cylinders. Each cylinder was fitted with an armature, round which was coiled an insulated strand of copper wire 67 feet in length, and 0'15 of an inch in diameter. Upon one of the magnet-cylinders sixteen permanent magnets were fixed, and to the sides of the other magnetcylinder was bolted an electro-magnet formed of two rectangular pieces of boiler-plate...
Page 53 - ... of 36 miles the temperature would be 3272°, sufficient to melt iron ; and at a depth of 54 miles, a heat of 4892° would prevail — a temperature at which all known substances would ]Ģiss into the liqiud or molten form.
Page 169 - ... mutual action. Each molecule is supposed to be a small body consisting in general of parts capable of being set into various kinds of motion relative to each other, such as rotation, oscillation, or vibration, the amount of energy existing in this form bearing a certain relation to that which exists in the form of the agitation of the molecules among each other. The mass of a molecule is different in different gases, but in the same gas all the molecules are equal. The pressure of the gas is...
Page 151 - The character of the spectrum of this star, taken together with its sudden outburst in brilliancy and its rapid decline in. brightness, suggests to us the rather bold speculation that, in consequence of some vast convulsion taking place in this object, large quantities of gas have been evolved from it; that the hydrogen present is burning by combination with some other element and furnishes the light represented by the bright lines...

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