Travels in Upper and Lower Egypt: During the Campaigns of General Bonaparte, Volume 1

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Page 109 - Still temples, nothing but temples ! and not a vestige of the hundred gates so celebrated in history ; no walls, quays, bridges, baths, or theatres ; not a single edifice of public utility or convenience ! Notwithstanding all the pains which I took in the research, I could find nothing but temples, walls covered with obscure emblems and hieroglyphics, which attested the ascendency of the priesthood, who still seemed to reisrn over these mighty ruins, and whose empire constantly haunted my imagination.
Page 126 - Immediately previous to the discovery of the route to India by the Cape of Good Hope, we find that the price of pepper in the markets of Europe had fallen to 6s.
Page 72 - Saracens, it is true, have done all in their power to deface or to conceal them ; but, as Denon remarks, the Egyptian monuments continue devoted to posterity, and have resisted equally the ravages of man and of time. In the midst of a vast field of bricks, and other pieces of baked earth, a very ancient temple is still left standing, surrounded with a pilastered gallery and two columns in the portico. Nothing is wanting but two pilasters on the left angle of this ruin. Other edifices had been attached...
Page 235 - Luxor, shews, that the elevation which the soil has undergone is very inconsiderable. Were they built of unbaked and therefore perishable earth! or did the great men, as well as the priests, inhabit the temples, and the people only huts...
Page 73 - Elephantine is, that the figures have more life, the drapery is more flowing, and falls into a better form of composition.* The fascination attending this review of the monuments of ancient art has perhaps carried us somewhat farther than is quite consistent with our plan, which compels us to abstain from minute details, however interesting and agreeable. There is no other nation in the world, if we except those on the eastern...
Page 47 - ... the rank of gods, by laws which have been revered without being promulgated, by science involved in pompous and enigmatical inscriptions, the first monuments of ancient learning which are still spared by the hand of time ; this abandoned sanctuary, surrounded with barbarism, and again restored to the desert from which it had been drawn forth, enveloped in the veil of mystery, and the obscurity of ages, whereby even its own colossal monuments are magnified to the imagination, still impressed the...
Page 148 - Nothing can be more grand, and at the same time more simple, than the small number of objects of which this entrance is composed. No city whatever makes so proud a display at its approach as this wretched village, the population of which consists of two or three thousand souls, who have taken up their abodes on the roofs and beneath the galleries of this temple, which has, nevertheless, the air of being in a manner uninhabited.
Page 225 - ... arrows, quivers, pikes, javelins, sabres, casques, and whips: in another was a collection of household utensils, such as caskets, chests of drawers, chairs, sofas, and beds, all of exquisite forms, and such as might well grace the apartments of modern luxury : as these were probably accurate representations of the objects themselves, it is almost a proof that the ancient Egyptians...
Page 181 - I HAD often heard speak of the Kamsin, which may be termed the hurricane of Egypt and the Desert ; it is equally terrible by the frightful spectacle which it exhibits when present, and by the consequences which follow its ravages. We had already passed with security one half of the season in which it appears, when in the evening of the...
Page 90 - ... constructed with more care, was ornamented in a higher degree than the rest ; the use made of it in the rites of the Catholic religion has impaired the original character, by adding square arched door-ways. In the sanctuary, close to the figures of Isis and Osiris, may still be seen the miraculous impression of the feet of St. Anthony, or St. Paul the hermit. The next day was the finest to me of my whole travels. I possessed seven or eight monuments in the space of six hundred yards, and could...

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