Gate of His Enemies

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Tyndale House Publishers, 1992 - Christian fiction - 337 pages
7 Reviews
The war has come, leaving in its wake a chasm between North and South, turning friends and brothers into enemies. Now, as the nation begins to understand the true meaning of civil war, so the Rocklins begin to understand the fierce and terrible pull of loyalty - to a way of life, to one's country, and to God. Deborah Steele finds herself torn between her passionate belief in the Union and her deep love for Dent Rocklin, a dashing Confederate officer. But it isn't until Deborah sets out on a daring mission to rescue a captured Union soldier that she and Dent discover how deep their true loyalties lie ... and how powerful real love can be.

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Review: Gate of His Enemies (The Appomattox Saga #2)

User Review  - Kristin Funk-neubauer - Goodreads

This was entertaining, and I like the way Morris writes about conversion experiences. Some of the plot points strain credulity, though. Read full review

Review: Gate of His Enemies (The Appomattox Saga #2)

User Review  - Michele Arnold - Goodreads

A simple but good story of family conflict during the civil war. Read full review


Mr President
Deborahs Recruit
The Washington Blues

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About the author (1992)

Gilbert Morris, May 24, 1929 - Gilbert Morris was born on May 24, 1929 in Forrest City Arkansas. He received his Bachelor of Arts in English in 1958 from Arkansas State University. He went on to earn his Master's in English from ASU as well and eventually earned his Doctorate in English from the University of Arkansas in 1968. After graduating from college, Morris became a pastor for a Baptist Church in Alabama. He resided there from 1955 until 1961, at which point he accepted an appointment as a professor at Ouchita Baptist University. Morris now writes books full time, and all of his stories have a basis in Christian faith. Over the course of his career, Morris has sold millions of copies of his titles. He has been a Gold medallion finalist several times and has received five angel awards, three for the Winslow series and two for the Appomatox Series. He won the National Award for Poetry from Cloverleaf in 1978.

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