Adventures of David Grayson

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Book League of America, 1910 - 264 pages
 

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Page 29 - The World is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; Little we see in nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
Page 24 - Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know? The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea.
Page 123 - ... nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect, that! bred them. I know they are as lively and as vigorously productive, as those fabulous dragon's teeth; and, being sown up and down, may chance to spring up armed men.
Page 76 - ... the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkened, and the doors shall be shut in the streets, when the sound of the grinding is low...
Page 76 - Remember now thy Creator in the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not, nor the years draw nigh, when thou shalt say, "I have no pleasure in them"; while the sun, or the light, or the moon, or the stars, be not darkened, nor the clouds return after the rain...
Page 32 - November chill blaws loud wi' angry sugh; The short'ning winter-day is near a close; The miry beasts retreating frae the pleugh; The black'ning trains o' craws to their repose: The toil-worn Cotter frae his labour goes, This night his weekly moil is at an end, Collects his spades, his mattocks, and his hoes, Hoping the morn in ease and rest to spend, And weary, o'er the moor, his course does hameward bend. At length his lonely cot appears in view, Beneath the shelter of an aged tree; Th' expectant...
Page 32 - A horse is no wealth to us if we cannot ride, nor a picture if we cannot see, nor can any noble thing be wealth, except to a, noble person.
Page 58 - Let the Wealthy and Great Roll in Splendor and State, I envy them not, I declare it ; I eat my own Lamb, My own Chickens and Ham, I shear my own Fleece and I wear it. I have Lawns, I have Bowers, I have Fruits, I have Flowers ; The Lark is my morning alarmer — So Jolly Boys, now — Here's God Speed the Plough, Long Life and Success to the Farmer.
Page 123 - ... as a snail moves, to that chub you intend to catch ; let your bait fall gently upon the water three or four inches before him, and he will infallibly take the bait.
Page 15 - How sweet the west wind sounds in my own trees! How graceful climb those shadows on my hill! I fancy these pure waters and the flags Know me, as does my dog: we sympathize; And, I affirm, my actions smack of the soil.

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