San Francisco Through Earthquake and Fire

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P. Elder, 1906 - Earthquakes - 55 pages
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Page 22 - The Federal Troops, the members of the Regular Police Force and all Special Police Officers have been authorized by me to KILL any and all persons found engaged in Looting or in the Commission of Any Other Crime.
Page 23 - Police Force, and all Special Police Officers have been authorized to KILL any and all persons found engaged in looting or in the commission of any other crime. "I have directed all the Gas and Electric Lighting Companies not to turn on gas or electricity until I order them to do so; you may therefore expect the city to remain in darkness for an indefinite time. "I request all citizens to remain at home from darkness until daylight of every night until order is restored. "I warn all citizens of the...
Page 23 - Lighting Co.'s not to turn on Gas or Electricity until I order them to do so. You may therefore expect the city to remain in darkness for an indefinite time. "I request all citizens to remain at home from darkness until daylight every night until order is restored. "I WARN all Citizens of the danger of fire from Damaged or Destroyed Chimneys, Broken or Leaking Gas Pipes or Fixtures, or any like cause. "EE SCHMITZ, Mayor. "Dated April 18, 1906.
Page 55 - This is the spirit to rebuild and over come in the face of adversity. The spirit has been expressed so ably by the Berkeley poet, Keeler, that he is quoted in conclusion. Of cities as of men it is true that there is a destiny that guides their ends, rough-hew them how we will. Beside the Golden Gate, with one of the world's most perfect harbors bearing the commerce of the Orient to its wharves, the metropolis of all the trans-Rocky Mountain region, San Francisco could not be destroyed. It would rise...
Page vii - Families of artisans and mechanics living in homes and lodging houses south of Market Street were bestirring themselves. Oil stoves were lighted and smoke was curling out of kitchen chimneys . . . thirteen minutes later, the deeps of the earth far down under the foundations of the city began to rumble and vibrate.
Page 38 - The cow is in the hammock. The cat is in the lake, The children are in the garbage can — What difference does it make...
Page 19 - ... in helpless bands. Out of the narrow alleyways and streets they swarmed like processions of black ants. With bundles swung on poles across their shoulders they retreated, their helpless little women in pantaloons following with the children, all passive and uncomplaining. In every quarter the night was full of terror. The mighty column of smoke rose thousands of feet in air, crimsoned by the wild sea of flame below it.
Page 53 - ... rebuild, a spirit that manifested itself even while the tragedy was at its height. Says Keeler, And this is the spirit of the new San Francisco. It rises above misfortune; it grows great through disaster; it expands to the immeasurable needs of the hour. We who have suffered all things will dare to do all things: this is the temper of the people. Ten square miles in ruins — ten square miles out of the heart of the most populous city of the Pacific — its banks, office buildings, warehouses,...
Page 53 - The victims of destruction who settled wherever they could on the rim of the city had one theory in common with those whose homes escaped the fury of the fire. This was a resolute determination to rebuild, a spirit that manifested itself even while the tragedy was at its height. Says Keeler, And this is the spirit of the new San Francisco. It rises above misfortune; it grows great through disaster; it expands to the immeasurable needs of the hour. We who have suffered all things will dare to do all...
Page 53 - ... dare to do all things: this is the temper of the people. Ten square miles in ruins — ten square miles out of the heart of the most populous city of the Pacific — its banks, office buildings, warehouses, factories, churches, libraries, museums, homes incendiated — nothing left but broken birch and scrap-iron throughout all those desolate wastes of hill and plain, — and the spirit of the people not merely unbroken but exalted, enthused with the will to do and serve. (Charles Keeler, San...

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