The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, Volume 2

Front Cover
Houghton, 1906
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
3
II
90
III
110
IV
123
V
143
VI
155
VII
171
VIII
185
XI
232
XII
247
XIII
263
XIV
282
XV
299
XVI
312
XVII
330
XVIII
352

IX
192
X
223

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 92 - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute ; From the centre all round to the sea I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Page 100 - I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived...
Page 356 - He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him ; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his faVor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings.
Page 15 - Most of the luxuries and many of the so-called comforts of life are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind. With respect to luxuries and comforts, the wisest have ever lived a more simple and meagre life than the poor. The ancient philosophers — Chinese, Hindoo, Persian, and Greek — were a class than which none has been poorer in outward riches, none so rich in inward.
Page 58 - We are in great haste to construct a magnetic telegraph from Maine to Texas ; but Maine and Texas, it may be, have nothing important to communicate.
Page 94 - I do not propose to write an ode to dejection, but to brag as lustily as chanticleer in the morning, standing on his roost, if only to wake my neighbors up.
Page 190 - Not till we are lost, in other words, not till we have lost the world, do we begin to find ourselves, and realize where we are and the infinite extent of our relations.
Page 358 - Some are dinning in our ears that we Americans, and moderns generally, are intellectual dwarfs compared with the ancients, or even the Elizabethan men. But what is that to the purpose? A living dog is better than a dead lion. Shall a man go and hang himself because he belongs to the race of pygmies, and not be the biggest pygmy that he can? Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made.
Page 98 - I had left behind, dwindled and twinkling with as fine a ray to my nearest neighbor, and to be seen only in moonless nights by him. Such was that part of...
Page 253 - ... and frequently two red ones to one black. The legions of these Myrmidons covered all the hills and vales in my woodyard, and the ground was already strewn with the dead and dying, both red and black. It was the only battle which I have ever witnessed, the only battle-field I ever trod while the battle was raging; internecine war — the red republicans on the one hand, and the black imperialists on the other.

Bibliographic information