Paradise Lost: A Poem, in Twelve Books. The Author John Milton. Printed from the Text of Tonson's Correct Edition of 1711. A New Edition, with Notes and the Life of the Author, in Three Volumes, by Thomas Newton, ...

Front Cover
proprietors, 1795
2 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

beautiful, absolutely riveting and spontaneuos combustion.... Covered an enormous breadth and all the while rememembered the pretty white horses

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 200 - Did I request thee, Maker, from my clay To mould me man ? Did I solicit thee From darkness to promote me...
Page 180 - Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat Sighing through all her Works gave signs of woe, That all was lost.
Page 231 - And the whole earth was of one language and of one speech. And it came to pass, as they journeyed from the east, that they found a plain in the land of Shinar; and they dwelt there.
Page 167 - My lord delayeth his coming; and shall begin to smite his fellowservants, and to eat and drink with the drunken ; the lord of that servant shall come in a day when he looketh not for him, and in an hour that he is not aware of, and shall cut him asunder, and appoint him his portion with the hypocrites: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.
Page 213 - And Elisha prayed, and said, LORD, I pray thee, open his eyes, that he may see. And the LORD opened the eyes of the young man; and he saw: and, behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha.
Page 212 - And Jacob went on his way, and the angels of God met him. And when Jacob saw them, he said, This is God's host : and he called the name of that place Mahanaim.
Page 233 - And Terah took Abram his son, and Lot the son of Haran his son's son, and Sarai his daughter in law, his son Abram's wife ; and they went forth with them from Ur of the Chaldees, to go into the land of Canaan ; and they came unto Haran, and dwelt there.
Page 115 - Hurled headlong flaming from the ethereal sky With hideous ruin and combustion down To bottomless perdition, there to dwell In adamantine* chains and penal fire, Who durst defy the Omnipotent to arms.
Page 196 - And I looked, and behold, a pale horse : and his name that sat on him was Death, and hell followed with him. And power was given unto them over the fourth part of the earth, to kill with sword, and with hunger, and with death, and with the beasts of the earth.
Page 237 - Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross; And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.

Bibliographic information