A general historico-critical introduction to the Old Testament, tr. by W.L. Alexander

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Contents

Period of the Neologian criticism
12
Appellation and Division of the Pentateuch
13
The Author of the Pentateuch calls himself Moses
14
History of the Canon
17
61
19
7 Circumstances conducive to the closing of the Canon
22
Unity of the Pentateuch Positive evidence of it
23
Time of the closing of the Canon
26
By whom was the Canon collected?
36
Motives for the reception of any Book into the Canon
45
Division of the Canon into three classes of Books
47
General Examination of the FragmentHypothesis
48
Refutation of certain erroneous views
59
History of the Canon among the Jews of Palestine and those of Alexandria
61
Examination in detail of the Arguments for the Divisi bility of the Pentateuch into Separate Documents a Genesis
62
Testimony of the New Testament respecting the Old Tes tament Canon
68
History of the Old Testament Canon in the Christian Church
72
Catholic and Protestant Canon
77
History of the original languages of the Old Testament
81
Oriental languages
82
Aramaic language
83
c Leviticus
86
Continuation Language of Babylon
88
d Numbers and Deuteronomy 15 Internal Truth of the Pentateuch Criticism of the History in it The Primitive History Gen i iii
90
Continuation Aramaic dialect in the north of Palestine
94
New Aramaic dialect The Syriac as an ecclesiastical language
99
Continuation Gen iv ix
103
The dialect of the South The Arabic language
106
The Coran and Muhammedan literature
114
Critical Review of the Table of Nations Gen x
118
Hebrew languageits names and designations
124
Antiquity of the Hebrew language
128
The History of the Patriarchs Gen xi xvi
131
General characteristics of the Hebrew as a written lan guage
136
Continuation Adoption of foreign words into the Heb rew
145
Poetical and Prosaic style
149
Dialects of the Hebrew language
152
Different periods in the Hebrew language till the time of the captivity
155
Continuation Gen xvii xxv
156
B PostMosaic period Age of David and Solomon
171
The old Prophetic literature
187
History of the Text of the Old Testament
225
Continuation Gen xlviii 1
226
Antiquity of letterwriting among the Semitic nations
227
Art of writing among the Hebrews Its antiquity
231
Criticism of the History in Exodus chaps i xix
235
Ancient writing materials
240
More extensive graphic development of alphabetic writing in general
244
Development of the Hebrew writing
246
Continuation Transition of the OldHebrew writing into the squarewriting
249
Further history of the square writing Different views as to its rise
252
The square writing on monuments
254
Appendages to writing Vowels Period of the living language
256
Vocalisation of the LXX and of Origen
257
Jerome and the Talmud
259
The vowel signs of the Masoretes
262
The giving of the Law at Sinai General Remarks
265
Further history of vocalisation Diverse views of this subject
266
Separation of words
269
Separations according to the meaning Verses
270
Other larger divisions
273
History of the text of the Old Testament as a whole First periodto the closing of the Canon
275
Tulmudists Treatment of the text among the Talmudists The Masoretes and their labours Manuscripts Continuation Synagogue rolls Continuation Pri...
277
279
282
Continuation Of the Decalogue c Exodus xx xl 2S0 26 Historical Criticism of Leviticus
293
303
306
318
323
351
349
358
354
360
361
369
371
375
375
Critical process in reference to the historical witnesses
376
Criticism as respects its objects
378
Estimate of certain other critical systems
380
Principles of Old Testament hermeneutics
383
Philological understanding of the Old Testament
384
Historical Understanding of the Old Testament
385
The Theological Understanding of the Old Testament 386
386
Refutation of some other Modes of Interpretation in their application to the Old Testament
387
Book of Kings
390

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Page 37 - Amram to Moses ; Moses to Joshua ; Joshua to the Elders ; the Elders to the Prophets ; the Prophets to the Wise Men ; and then from one to the other down to Solomon. The sign of distress is very little different from that of the Freemasons.
Page 333 - Zunz justly remarks (op. oil. p. 63), " The prophetical writings, not containing anything of the nature of legal enactment, admitted of a greater latitude in handling the text. This became even unavoidable because of the more obscure language and the predictions concerning Israel's future by which they are characterized. Even in the case of the historical books, Jonathan often acts the part of an expositor. In the case of the prophets themselves, this course of exposition — in reality becoming...
Page 391 - Text Book of Popery ; comprising a Brief History of the Council of Trent, and a Complete View of Roman Catholic Theology.
Page 391 - The Sacred writings of the apostles and evangelists of Jesus Christ, commonly styled the New Testament; translated from the original Greek, by George Campbell, James Macknight, and Philip Doddridge, Doctors of the church of Scotland.
Page 78 - Si quis autem libros ipsos integros cum omnibus suis partibus, prout in Ecclesia Catholica legi consueverunt, et in veteri vulgata Latina editione habentur, pro sacris et canonicis non susceperit; et traditiones praedictas sciens et prudens contempserit; anathema sit.
Page 79 - Hos libros agnoscimus esse canonicos, id est, ut fidei nostrae normam et regulam habemus, atque non tantum ex communi ecclesiae consensu, sed etiam multo magis ex testimonio et intrinseca Spiritus sancti persuasione : quo suggerente docemur, illos ab aliis libris ecclesiasticis discernere, qui ut sint ules (utiles ?) non sunt tamen ejusmodi, ut ex iis constitui possitaliquis fidei articulus.
Page 391 - Journal of a Tour in Ceylon and India, undertaken at the Request of the Baptist Missionary Society, in Company with the Rev.
Page 272 - Nemo cum Prophetas versibus viderit esse descriptos metro eos aestimet apud Hebraeos ligari, et aliquid simile habere de Psalmis vel operibus Salomonis : sed quod in Demosthene et Tullio solet fieri, ut per cola scribantur et commata, qui utique prosa et non versibus conscripserunt, nos quoque utilitati legentium providentes, interpretationem novam novo scribendi gcnere distinximus.
Page 392 - The Christian Atonement: its Basis, Nature, and Bearings ; or, The Principle of Substitution Illustrated, as applied in the Redemption of Man. With Notes and Illustrations. By the Rev. Joseph Gilbert:— IV.
Page 356 - ... usu in ipsa Ecclesia probata est, in publicis lectionibus, disputationibus , praedicationibus , et expositionibus pro authentica habeatur; et ut nemo illam rejicere quovis praetextu audeat, vel praesumat.

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