Journal of the Franklin Institute

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Franklin Institute, 1831 - Meteorology
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Vols. 1-69 include more or less complete patent reports of the U. S. Patent Office for years 1825-1859. cf. Index to v. 1-120 of the Journal, p. [415]
 

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Page 60 - I' the commonwealth I would by contraries Execute all things: For no kind of traffic Would I admit; no name of magistrate; Letters should not be known ; riches, poverty, And use of service, none; contract, succession, Bourn, bound of land, tilth, vineyard, none; No use of metal, corn, or wine, or oil; No occupation; all men idle, all, And women too, but innocent and pure : No sovereignty— Seb.
Page 85 - Be it known that I, John Fitch, of Philadelphia, in the county of Philadelphia, the State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and improved mode of preventing steam-boilers from bursting, and I do hereby declare that the following is a full and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters of reference marked thereon.
Page 354 - Increase or diminution of the effect, with the increased or diminished intensity of the cause, in cases which admit of increase and diminution. 4th. Proportionality of the effect to its cause in all cases of direct unimpeded action. 5th. Reversal of the effect with that of the cause.
Page 411 - Two centuries ago not one person in a thousand wore stockings; one century ago not one person in five hundred wore them; now not one person in a thousand is without them.
Page 414 - It is nevertheless apparent, even from observing only the expression of countenance, the complexion, and the gait, that the functions of the stomach and the heart are greatly impaired, even in those who consider themselves well. We see no plump and rosy tailors; none of fine form and strong muscle.* The spine is generally curved.
Page 242 - ... tons, then it might be put on only four wheels. The company to be at liberty to test the boiler, etc., by a pressure of one hundred and fifty pounds to the square inch.
Page 353 - ... in force against that of our intellectual and moral wants. Knowledge is not, like food, destroyed by use, but rather augmented and perfected. It acquires not, perhaps, a greater certainty, but at least a confirmed authority and a probable duration, by universal assent: and there is no body of knowledge so complete but that it may acquire accession, or so free from error but that it may receive correction in passing through the minds of millions.
Page 350 - Hastings' sand; while this, on which Bexhill is situated, is separated from the coal-strata by a series of interposed beds of such enormous thickness as to render all idea of penetrating through them absurd. The history of mining operations is full of similar cases, where a very moderate acquaintance with the usual order of nature, to say nothing of theoretical views, would have saved many a sanguine adventurer from utter ruin.
Page 350 - In securing us from important mistakes in attempting what is, in itself, possible, by means either inadequate, or actually opposed, to the end in view.
Page 238 - ... are inapplicable to American timber, though bearing the same name. It is much to be desired that numerous and accurate experiments be made in this country by those having the requisite zeal and opportunities ; our architects will then know with certainty the qualities of the different kinds of woods they are using, and instead of working at hazard and in the dark, as they now too often do, they will be guided by the sure light of practical science to certain and definite results. If these experiments...

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