Green Phoenix: Restoring the Tropical Forests of Guanacaste, Costa Rica

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Oxford University Press, Jan 9, 2003 - Nature - 611 pages
Can we prevent the destruction of the world's tropical forests? In the fire-scarred hills of Costa Rica, award-winning science writer William Allen found a remarkable answer: we can not only prevent their destruction--we can bring them back to their former glory. In Green Phoenix, Allen tells the gripping story of a large group of Costa Rican and American scientists and volunteers who set out to save the tropical forests in the northwestern section of the country. It was an area badly damaged by the fires of ranchers and small farmers; in many places a few strands of forest strung across a charred landscape. Despite the widely held belief that tropical forests, once lost, are lost forever, the team led by the dynamic Daniel Janzen from the University of Pennsylvania moved relentlessly ahead, taking a broad array of political, ecological, and social steps necessary for restoration. They began with 39 square miles and, by 2000, they had stitched together and revived some 463 square miles of land and another 290 of marine area. Today this region is known as the Guanacaste Conservation Area, a fabulously rich landscape of dry forest, cloud forest, and rain forest that gives life to some 235,000 species of plants and animals. It may be the greatest environmental success of our time, a prime example of how extensive devastation can be halted and reversed. This is an inspiring story, and in recounting it, Allen writes with vivid power. He creates lasting images of pristine beaches and dense forest and captures the heroics and skill of the scientific teams, especially the larger-than-life personality of the maverick ecologist Daniel Janzen. It is a book everyone concerned about the environment will want to own.
 

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Excellent book. Written as a story, gives both political and biological insights to the Guanacaste Conservation Area. A good basic introduction to the hard work necessary to establish the reserve and a hint of the amazing biological research that continues there today with the help of locally involved parataxonomists. 

Contents

IV
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V
13
VI
25
VII
46
VIII
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IX
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XI
101
XVI
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XVII
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XXIII
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Page xx - A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.
Page xvi - An ecologist must either harden his shell and make believe that the consequences of science are none of his business, or he must be the doctor who sees the marks of death in a community that believes itself well and does not want to be told otherwise.
Page xvi - One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds.

About the author (2003)

William Allen is an award-winning science writer at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. His reporting on tropical forests has appeared in such publications as The Sciences, BioScience, and Harvard. He lives in Chesterfield, Missouri.

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