Cyclopedia of American Agriculture: Animals

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Liberty Hyde Bailey
Macmillan, 1908 - Agriculture
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Page 504 - ... 4. A mare sired by a registered standard trotting horse, provided she is the dam of two trotters with records of 2:30. 5. A mare sired by a registered standard trotting horse, provided her first, second and third dams are each sired by a registered standard trotting horse.
Page 138 - Studies from the Department of Pathology of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, Vol.
Page 184 - Water. — From a source known to be pure, protected from contamination from seepage or surface drainage. Care of Utensils. — Such as to avoid contamination by dust as well as coarser dirt. Small-top Pail. — With opening not over seven inches in diameter, and at least one-third of this opening protected by hood. IV. EMPLOYEES. — Free from contagious disease and not dwelling in nor frequenting any place where contagious disease exists.
Page 503 - STANDARD. When an animal meets these requirements and Is duly registered It shall be accepted as a standard-bred trotter: 1.— The progeny of a registered standard trotting horse and a registered standard trotting mare, 2.— A stallion sired by a registered standard trotting horse, provided his dam and grandam were sired by registered standard trotting horses, and he himself has a trotting record of 2:30 and Is the sire of three trotters with records of 2 :30, from different mares.
Page 477 - ... 3. — A mare whose sire is a registered standard pacing horse and whose dam and grandam were sired by registered standard pacing...
Page 117 - ... 8 pounds of chop per day. Turning to the tables, we find that 20 pounds of hay, 4 pounds of oats and 4 pounds of corn contain digestible nutrients as follows: — Upon comparison of the nutrients furnished by this ration with Wolff's standard as given in Table I, it is discovered that while the dry matter and total nutrients are not far out of the way, the protein is much too small, the carbohydrates and fat are somewhat too great, while the nutritive ratio is far too wide. This result might...
Page 503 - The progeny of a registered standard trotting horse and a registered standard trotting mare. "2. A stallion sired by a registered standard trotting horse, provided his dam and grandam were sired by registered standard trotting horses, and he himself has a trotting record of 2:30 and is the sire of three trotters with records of 2:30, from different mares. " 3. A mare whose sire is a registered standard trotting horse...
Page 367 - Color — Any shade of red. The switch of tail and udder may be white, with some white running forward to the navel. Nose of a clear flesh color. Interior of ears should be of a yellowish, waxy color ........ .... 2 Objections — An extreme dark, or an extreme light red is not desirable. A cloudy nose or one with dark spots.
Page 257 - ... for bologna and summer sausage. Hog casings are made from the small intestines of the hog, and are used mainly for pork link sausage. Sheep casings are made from the small intestines of sheep, and are commonly used for wiener-wurst and other small sausages. SMOKING OF MEATS Pickled and cured meats are smoked to aid in their preservation and to give flavor and palatability. The creosote formed by the combustion of the wood closes the pores to some extent, excluding the air, and is objectionable...
Page 256 - Hams and bacon cured in the spring will keep right through the summer after they are smoked. The meat will be sweet and palatable if it is properly smoked, and the flavor will be good. Dry-cured pork. — For each 100 pounds of meat weigh out 5 pounds of salt, 2 pounds of granulated sugar, and 2 ounces of saltpeter, and mix them thoroughly. Rub the meat once every three days with a third of the mixture. While the meat is curing it is best to have it packed in a barrel or tight box. For the sake of...

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