Altowan, Or, Incidents of Life and Adventure in the Rocky Mountains, Volume 1

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Page xiv - ... Anthony ; and, as evidence of his truth, produced the tobacco said 'to have been sent to them by the Sioux, and which generally accompanies such propositions for a war league. As no doubt was entertained of the truth of this report, the commanding officer directed me (the adjutant) to make an arrangement with some of the voyageurs connected with the Indian trading house near the fort, to carry the intelligence to Fort Armstrong, situated on Rock Island in the Mississippi, near the mouth of Rock...
Page x - I have since visited him and spent many a happy hour. There, he is not only surrounded by a devoted tenantry, whose cares he makes his own, and a large circle of distinguished friends, who honor and appreciate his virtues ; but by galleries of magnificent paintings, executed by our countryman MILLER, from sketches by himself, made during the second visit of the author to the Rocky Mountains, Oregon, and California.
Page 232 - On a sudden turn of the road round a projecting cliff", Altowan stopped to contemplate the scene below, which, though not new to him, is one of undying wonder and magnificence. Far over an extensive vale rise
Page v - When in 1919, I entered the army, I too, in common with most persons in the Atlantic States, believed in the nursery picture of Indian life which had become traditional in all our homes, and had I not become a wanderer in the Western wilds, and a sojourner in the wigwams of its people, I should doubtless, have been one of the most confiding believers in Mr. Cooper's portrait of the aborigines — based, as it unquestionably is, upon his profound knowledge of their character, acquired in connection...
Page xvii - ... shrieks of the damned, and then, again, partook of the character of the recitative in an Italian opera, until, at length, it died away, and all was silence. Then came old...
Page xx - Paradise of the white man ! but at the same time gave me to understand that he did not believe such was the object of my visit to the banks of the Mississippi. Indian-like, he sought not to pry farther into my affairs, but expressed his respect for all who knew how to keep to themselves their own counsels and the counsels of their government. His remarks were kind, and in the nature of approbation for the past and advice for the future ; and coming from such a source, made a lasting impression.
Page xx - Potawatomie chief, that doubt was now at an end ; and of course, a sense of duty to a whole regiment of officers and men, their wives and children, was as imperative in requiring my advance, as was the fear of disgrace in forbidding my return. With two such motives for a right decision, there could...
Page 175 - Jim defied him; John started up the hill, and rolled a huge rock down which went through a lodge, broke a gun and if it had not been brought up by a nest of kettles and a bale of meat would have killed a Canadian. Charley Town made a song about it, "The rock rushed down with a mighty din, and broke a gun and a Frenchman's shin.
Page vii - A similarity of tastes and pursuits, soon produced an intimacy, gradually ripening into a friendship, which I trust, is destined to continue through life. He was one of the gallant fellows who fought under Wellington at Waterloo, and bore upon his person honorable marks of his gallantry upon that occasion, and among his insignia, the evidence of his country's gratitude.
Page xix - Winebago, who avowed himself the firm friend of the whites, and proceeded to point out the folly of any attempt to proceed in my expedition. He inquired its purport ; and when I told him that it was to visit a dying friend, he said I had better postpone the meeting until after death, when we would doubtless meet in the Paradise of the white man...

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