Latin Composition for Secondary Schools, Volume 1

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Ginn, 1904 - Latin language - 321 pages
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Contents

Relative with its Antecedent
11
Verb with its Subject
12
Verb with Two or More Subjects
13
General Rules
14
The Imperfect Indicative
15
The Perfect Indicative
17
Written Translation
18
THE SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD IN INDEPENDENT SENTENCES 18 The Subjunctive in General
19
The Optative Subjunctive
21
Written Translation
22
The Subjunctive in Rhetorical or Deliberative Questions
23
The Potential Subjunctive
24
THE IMPERATIVE MOOD pAC 23 The Imperative MoodProhibitions
25
Review and Written Translation
26
MOODS AND TENSES IN DEPENDENT AND SUBSTANTIVE CLAUSES 25 Sequence of Tenses
27
Peculiarities in TenseSequence
29
Pure and Relative Clauses of Purpose
30
Written Translation
32
Clauses of Purpose continued
34
Review and Written Translation
36
Clauses of Characteristic
37
Relative Clauses after dignus indignus etc
38
Pure and Relative Clauses of Result
39
Written Translation
41
Clauses introduced by quin and quominus
43
General Review of Purpose and Result
44
Review of Idioms and Written Translation
45
Causal Clauses introduced by quod quia quoniam and quand5
46
Causal Clauses introduced by cum and qui
47
Temporal Clauses introduced by postquam ut ubi simul ac ut primum etc
48
Written Translation
49
Temporal Clauses introduced by cum
50
Temporal Clauses introduced by anteqnam and priusquam
51
Temporal Clauses introduced by dum donec and quoad
52
Written Translation
53
Substantive Clauses introduced by quod
54
Direct Questions
55
Indirect Questions
56
Review and Written Translation
57
Conditional Sentences General Statements
58
Conditional Sentences with the Present or Perfect Subjunctive
61
Written Translation
62
Conditions in which the Protasis denotes Repeated Action
63
Conditional Clauses of Comparison with ac si ut si quasi etc
64
Concessive Clauses
66
Lesson Pags 60 Review and Written Translation
67
Clauses with dum modo dum modo denoting a Wish or a Pro viso
68
VH MOODS IN INDIRECT DISCOURSE 62 Declaratory Sentences in Indirect Discourse
69
Interrogative Sentences in Indirect Discourse
71
Review and Written Translation
82
Tenses of the Infinitive
83
The Infinitive as Object
85
The Complementary Infinitive
86
Written Translation
87
Tenses Adjective and Predicate Uses the Ablative Absolute
88
denoting Purpose the Second Periphrastic Conjugation the Dative of Agent
90
General Rules the Genitive the Dative
91
Written Translation
93
The Supine in urn and u
94
SYNTAX OF PRONOUNS 83 Personal Possessive and Reflexive Pronouns
95
Written Translation
96
Relative Interrogative and Indefinite Pronouns
97
Demonstrative Pronouns
98
Lesson X SYNTAX OF NOUNS Pagb 87 Expressions of Time
100
Review and Written Translation
101
Expressions of Place
102
The Genitive with Nouns
104
The Genitive in Apposition with a Possessive Pronoun the Predicate Genitive the Genitive with Adjectives
105
Written Translation
106
The Genitive with Verbs
107
General Rule Indirect Object
108
The Dative with Special Intransitive Verbs and with Passive Intransitives
110
Written Translation
111
The Dative with Compounds the Dative of Separation
112
The Dative of Possession the Dative of Purpose or End
113
The Dative of Reference the Dative with Adjectives
114
Review and Written Translation
115
Direct Object Cognate Accusative Accusative of Extent
116
Direct Object and Predicate Person and Thing
117
The Adverbial Accusative Subject of an Infinitive
118
Written Translation
120
General Consideration the Ablative of Separation of Source Originand Material of Cause
121
The Ablative of Agent of Comparison of Manner
122
The Ablative of Means the Ablative with utor fruor etc the Ablative with opus and flsus
123
Written Translation
124
The Ablative of Accompaniment of Degree of Difference of Quality or Characteristic
125
no The Ablative of Price of Specification with dignus and indignus
126
Index oF Grammatical Notes
129
THE MANILIAN
1
CATILINE IIV
34
THE ARCHIAS
89
Index of Grammatical Notes 101103
101
Disconnected Sentences and Continuous Prose
107
Vocabulary to Part III 147171
147
Synonyms and Contrasted Words 173180
173
Grammatical Summary 181190
181
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Page 11 - 42. A relative agrees with a predicate noun in its own clause rather than with an antecedent of different gender and number. Rhenus quod est flumen Gallicum, the Rhine, which is a Gallic stream.
Page 109 - Puero librum dat. b. Liber puero datur. Observe that the direct object of the active verb becomes the subject of the passive. Sentence c is foreign to the Latin idiom and cannot be thus expressed. The indirect object of the active cannot be used as
Page 60 - Future Indicative in both clauses: SI aderit, bene erit. if he is [shall be] here, it will be well. 2. Future Perfect Indicative in the condition, Future Indicative in the conclusion : Si adfuerit, bene erit, if he is [shall
Page 60 - Present Subjunctive in both clauses: SI adsit, bene sit, if he should be here, it would be well. 2. Perfect Subjunctive in the condition, Present Subjunctive in the conclusion: SI adfuerit, bene sit, if he should be [should have been] here, it
Page 60 - Imperfect or Perfect Indicative in both clauses: Si aderat, bene erat, if he was [then] here, it was well. SI adfuit, bene fuit, if he has been (was) here, it has been (was) well.
Page 60 - Pluperfect Subjunctive in both clauses: SI adf uisset, bene fuisset, if he had [then] been here, it would have been well (but he was NOT here).
Page 37 - the one to, such a man as to = is qui. 146. A test for the relative clause of characteristic is that the relative may be translated by the words of such a character that. 147. IDIOMS
Page 7 - ■was general. NB However, when sum expresses existence (there is, there was, etc.), it stands first or at any rate before the subject: erat nullum aliud iter, there was no other way. 29. A noun in apposition with a locative is put in the ablative, either with or without a preposition: Romae (in) urbe magna, at Rome, a great city. 30. IDIOMS AND PHRASES
Page 1 - speaker's mind. 3. The most emphatic place is the first; next in importance is the last; the weakest point is the middle. 4. As the most important word in the sentence is the subject, and the second in importance is the verb, these normally stand first and last respectively. Their respective modifiers stand next these according to their relative emphasis. This may be represented as follows:
Page 13 - Two accusatives, one of the person and the other of the thing, are

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