Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940

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Basic Books, Aug 1, 2008 - Social Science - 496 pages
The award-winning, field-defining history of gay life in New York City in the early to mid-20th century

Gay New York brilliantly shatters the myth that before the 1960s gay life existed only in the closet, where gay men were isolated, invisible, and self-hating. Drawing on a rich trove of diaries, legal records, and other unpublished documents, George Chauncey constructs a fascinating portrait of a vibrant, cohesive gay world that is not supposed to have existed. Called "monumental" (Washington Post), "unassailable" (Boston Globe), "brilliant" (The Nation), and "a first-rate book of history" (The New York Times), Gay New Yorkforever changed how we think about the history of gay life in New York City, and beyond.
 

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User Review  - lydia1879 - LibraryThing

I read this for research for a queer historical fiction novel I'm writing, and it was interesting. Chauncey gives a very detailed, thorough, well-researched account of queer meeting places, attitudes ... Read full review

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User Review  - DarthDeverell - LibraryThing

In Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890 – 1940, George Chauncey argues “that gay life in New York was less tolerated, less visible to outsiders, and more ... Read full review

Contents

Cover
Introduction
PART I
The Fairy as an Intermediate
Trade Wolves and the Boundaries of Normal
The Forging of Queer Identities and the Emergence
Urban Culture and the Policing of the City
Rooming Houses
The Social World of the Baths
The Village
The Double Life Camp Culture and the Making of
Prohibition and the Spectacle
The Exclusion of Homosexuality from the Public
The Strange Career of the Closet
Praise for Gay New York
Notes

Forging a

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About the author (2008)

George Chauncey is professor of American history at the University of Chicago and the author of Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940, which won the distinguished Turner and Curti Awards from the Organization of American Historians, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the Lambda Literary Award.

He testified as an expert witness on the history of antigay discrimination at the 1993 trial of Colorado's Amendment Two, which resulted in the Supreme Court's Romer v. Evans decision that antigay rights referenda were unconstitutional, and he was the principal author of the Historians' Amicus Brief, which weighed heavily in the Supreme Court's landmark decision overturning sodomy laws in Lawrence v. Texas (2003). The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, he lives and works in Chicago.