The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln

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Norton, 2005 - History - 1044 pages
5 Reviews
In this magisterial work, Sean Wilentz traces a historical arc from the earliest days of the republic to the opening shots of the Civil War. One of our finest writers of history, Wilentz brings to life the era after the American Revolution, when the idea of democracy remained contentious, and Jeffersonians and Federalists clashed over the role of ordinary citizens in government of, by, and for the people. The triumph of Andrew Jackson soon defined this role on the national level, while city democrats, Anti-Masons, fugitive slaves, and a host of others hewed their own local definitions. In these definitions Wilentz recovers the beginnings of a discontenttwo starkly opposed democracies, one in the North and another in the Southand the wary balance that lasted until the election of Abraham Lincoln sparked its bloody resolution. 75 illustrations.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ALincolnNut - LibraryThing

“The Rise of American Democracy,” by Princeton historian Sean Wilentz, is nothing short of a magisterial synthesis of political history in the United States from 1800 to 1860. In 800 pages, followed ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Schmerguls - LibraryThing

This massive study of democracy's advance in the US from 1800 to 1861 is brimming with careful and original research. There are 796 pages of text, 156 pages of notes, and a detailed 96 page index. I ... Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Sean Wilentz is the George Henry Davis 1886 Professor of American History at Princeton University and author of the Bancroft Prize–winning The Rise of American Democracy, Bob Dylan in America, and many other works. He is completing his next book, No Property in Man, on slavery, antislavery, and the Constitution, based on his Nathan I. Huggins Lectures delivered at Harvard in 2015.

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