The Student's Ovid: Selections from the Metamorphoses

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University of Oklahoma Press, 2000 - Foreign Language Study - 211 pages
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Ideally suited to intermediate to advanced college-level students, The Student’s Ovid offers twenty-one selections from the Metamorphoses, with notes to aid translation and interpretation. The introduction includes an essay on Ovid’s life and works, an outline of the structure of the Metamorphoses, and tips on Latin poetic forms and usage.

Accompanying each Latin passage is an introduction that provides background on the myths and their literary history, both in Ovid and in other classical authors. The detailed notes on each selection are designed to help students read and understand the Latin for themselves.

Other special features of this book include:

a glossary of mythological characters

lists of stories grouped by theme to help teachers design courses to suit their students’ interests

discussions of the basic concepts of classical meter, Latin pronunciation, and accentuation

reference charts on the declension of Greek nouns to aid the reading of proper names

a select bibliography of translations and secondary studies

 

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Contents

1ntroduction
3
The Metamorphoses
5
Thematic Lists
13
Grammatical 1ntroduction
15
Select Bibliography
20
Latin Texts
23
1 1150
25
1 262312
30
3 253315
49
3 339510
51
4 55166
57
4 663752
60
6 313381
63
6 675721
66
7 251349
68
8 183259
71

1 313415
32
1 452567
36
1 588667
43
3 1130
45
10 185
74
10 243297
77
Latin Meter
193
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC--AD 17/18), known as Ovid. Born of an equestrian family in Sulmo, Ovid was educated in rhetoric in Rome but gave it up for poetry. He counted Horace and Propertius among his friends and wrote an elegy on the death of Tibullus. He became the leading poet of Rome but was banished in 8 A.D. by an edict of Augustus to remote Tomis on the Black Sea because of a poem and an indiscretion. Miserable in provincial exile, he died there ten years later. His brilliant, witty, fertile elegiac poems include Amores (Loves), Heroides (Heroines), and Ars Amatoris (The Art of Love), but he is perhaps best known for the Metamorphoses, a marvelously imaginative compendium of Greek mythology where every story alludes to a change in shape. Ovid was admired and imitated throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson knew his works well. His mastery of form, gift for narration, and amusing urbanity are irresistible.

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