The Holocaust on Trial

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W. W. Norton & Company, Apr 17, 2002 - History - 352 pages

The account of a trial in which the very meaning of the Holocaust was put on the stand.

D. D. Guttenplan's The Holocaust on Trial is a bristling courtroom drama where the meaning of history is questioned. The plaintiff is British author David Irving, one of the world's preeminent military historians whose works are considered essential World War II scholarship and whose biographies of leading Nazi figures have been bestsellers. Irving refuses to admit to Hitler's responsibility in the extermination of European Jewry, replying that the Holocaust as we know it never happened. The defendant is Deborah Lipstadt, who blew the whistle on Irving, calling him "one of the most dangerous spokespersons for Holocaust denial." Irving sued for libel, and under English law, it was up to Lipstadt to prove the truth of her writings, and the falseness of Irving's views.
 

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User Review  - Chrisethier - LibraryThing

Update - Re-read in 2016. Love Guttenplan's even handedness and analysis about the issues. Honesty, this is a really good overview of the trial. This book is about the Irving vs. Penguin/Lipstadt ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - queensheherezade - LibraryThing

This is quite a rewarding read if you can persevere through the extensive historical detail given during the course of this momentous trial. This book was a prescribed text for a subject I took in law ... Read full review

Contents

Court Full
17
The Claimant
36
The Defendants
58
Discovery
83
A paper Eichmann?
106
Mr Death
138
Auschwitz
162
Massive confrontation
196
Germans
235
Closing arguments
255
A reasoned judgment
273
Numbers
287
Afterword
309
Notes
317
Index
326
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

D. D. Guttenplan, journalist and essayist, lives in London. He has written on the Irving trial for Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times, and The Guardian.

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