Changing the Wor(l)d: Discourse, Politics, and the Feminist Movement

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Psychology Press, 1997 - Political Science - 249 pages
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Changing the Wor(l)d draws on feminist publishing, postmodern theory and feminist autobiography to powerfully critique both liberal feminism and scholarship on the women's movement, arguing that both ignore feminism's unique contributions to social analysis and politics. These contributions recognize the power of discourse, the diversity of women's experiences, and the importance of changing the world through changing consciousness.

Young critiques social movement theory and five key studies of the women's movement, arguing that gender oppression can be understood only in relation to race, sexuality, class and ethnicity; and that feminist activism has always gone beyond the realm of public policy to emphasize improving women's circumstances through transforming discourse and consciousness. Young examines feminist discursive politics, critiques social science methodology, and proposes an alternative approach to understanding the women's movement.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Feminist Publishing As Discursive Politics
25
The Autotheoretical Texts
61
Problems in Theory and Method
99
Social Movement Theory
147
Power and Subjectivity Domination and Resistance
169
Social Science Methodology
191
Last WordsWords First
201
Notes
205
References Index ix
221
ཕཙ ༢ ༤ཙཧྨཧྨསྶཝཾ 209 237 245
222
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Stacey Young received a Ph.D. in Government from Cornell University. She has taught government, women's studies and writing at Cornell University and at Skidmore College. She has also worked as a consultant on development and HIV/AIDS in Nairobi, Kenya, and as a journalist in Kampala, Uganda, where she currently lives. Her articles on sexuality and politics appear in several anthologies.

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