Self and Salvation: Being Transformed

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 4, 1999 - Religion - 298 pages
David F. Ford makes a unique contribution to the debate about the Christian doctrine of salvation. Using the pivotal image of the face, Professor Ford offers a constructive and contemporary account of the self being transformed. He engages with three modern thinkers (Levinas, Jungel and Ricoeur) in order to rethink and reimagine the meaning of self. Developing the concept of a worshipping self, he goes on to explore the dimensions of salvation through the lenses of scripture, worship practices, the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and the lives of contemporary saints. He uses different genres and traditions to show how the self flourishes through engagement with God, other people, and the responsibilities and joys of ordinary living. The result is a habitable theology of salvation which is immersed in Christian faith, thought and practice while also being deeply involved with modern life in a pluralist world.
 

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Contents

Levinas Jüngel Ricoeur
7
Facing
17
a hospitable self
30
a self without idols
45
a worshipping self
73
a singing self
107
a eucharistic self
137
Facing Jesus Christ
167
The face on the cross and the worship of God
191
Thérèse of Lisieux
216
Dietrich Bonhoeffer
241
Feasting
266
Bibliography
281
Index of scriptural references
287
Index
291
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