Picture this: How Pictures Work

Front Cover
Chronicle Books, 2000 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 96 pages
Everyone knows that a picture tells a thousand words. But what about the elements that make up a picture? Using the tale of Little Red Riding Hood as an example, Molly Bang uses boldly graphic artwork to explain how images -- and their individual components -- work to tell a story that engages the emotions: Why are diagonals dramatic? Why are curves calming? Why does red feel hot and blue feel cold?

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About the author (2000)

Molly Bang was born in Princeton, New Jersey in 1943. After college, Bang taught English in Japan. She returned to the U.S and earned her graduate degree in East Asian Languages and Literatures, then worked in India, Bangladesh, and West Africa for Johns Hopkins, Unicef and Harvard. Her first books were translations of folktales, which she also illustrated. Bang has received many awards and honors, including the prestigious Caldecott Honor Book Award three times, for The Grey Lady and the Strawberry Snatcher, Ten, Nine, Eight and When Sophie Gets Angry - Really, Really Angry. She won the Giverny Award for Best Science Picture Book for Common Ground in 1998. Ten, Nine, Eight also won the ALA Notable Children's Book and When Sophie Gets Angry - Really, Really Angry, won the Charlotte Zolotow Award. It was also an ALA Notable Book and a Jane Addams Children's Honor Book Her titles include Nobody Particular: One Woman's Fight to Save the Bays, Tiger's Fall, Little Rat Sets Sail, My Light, and Picture This: Perception and Composition.

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