Moby-Dick

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, 1999 - Fiction - 640 pages
Herman Melville's peerless allegorical masterpiece is the epic saga of the fanatical Captain Ahab, who swears vengeance on the mammoth white whale that has crippled him. Often considered to be the Great American Novel, Moby-Dick is at once a starkly realistic story of whaling, a romance of unusual adventure, and a searing drama of heroic courage, moral conflict, and mad obsession. It is world-renowned as the greatest sea story ever told.
Moby-Dick, widely misunderstood in its own time, has since become an indubitable classic of American literature.
 

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Moby Dick is a classic American novel with no plot

User Review  - Allicat07 - Borders

Actually, Moby Dick does have a plot somewhere behind all of Herman Melville's fancy writing, obscure and numerous references, and uninteresting lectures. If you have read up about Moby Dick, you ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pbandy - LibraryThing

Perhaps the most amazing novel in American literature. The thousands of pages of literary scholarship are enough to prove the book's seemingly endless amount of unturned rocks. For a casual reader a ... Read full review

Contents

Etymology
5
Extracts
7
Loomings
21
The CarpetBag
26
The SpouterInn
30
The Counterpane
44
Breakfast
48
The Street
50
The Sphynx
317
The Jeroboams Story
319
The MonkeyRope
324
Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale
328
The Sperm Whales Head
334
The Right Whales Head
338
The BatteringRam
341
The Great Heidelburgh Tun
343

The Chapel
52
The Pulpit
56
The Sermon
58
A Bosom Friend
67
Nightgown
71
Biographical
73
Wheelbarrow
75
Nantucket
79
Chowder
81
The Ship
84
The Ramadan
98
His Mark
104
The Prophet
108
All Astir III
111
Going Aboard
113
Merry Christmas
116
The Lee Shore
121
The Advocate
122
Postscript
126
Knights and Squires
127
Ahab
134
Enter Ahab to him Stubb
138
The Pipe
141
Queen Mab
142
Cetology
144
The Specksynder
157
The CabinTable
159
The MastHead
165
The QuarterDeckAhab and all
171
Sunset
179
Dusk
180
First NightWateh
181
Midnight Forecastle
182
Moby Dick
189
The Whiteness of the Whale
198
Hark
207
The Chart
208
The Affidavit
213
Surmises
222
The MatMaker
224
The First Lowering
227
The Hyena
237
Ahabs Boat and Crew Fedallah
239
The SpiritSpout
241
The Pequod meets the Albatross
245
The Gam
247
The TownHos Story
251
Monstrous Pictures of Whales
271
Of the Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales
276
Of Whales in Paint in Teeth etc
279
Brit
282
Squid
284
The Line
287
Stubb Kills a Whale
290
The Dart
295
The Crotch
297
Stubbs Supper
298
The Whale as a Dish
306
The Shark Massacre
308
Cutting In
310
The Blanket
312
The Funeral
315
Cistern and Buckets
345
The Prairie
349
The Nut
351
The Pequod meets the Virgin
354
The Honor and Glory of Whaling
364
Jonah Historically Regarded
367
Pitchpoling
369
The Fountain
371
The Tail
376
The Grand Armada
381
Schools Schoolmasters
393
FastFish and LooseFish
396
Heads or Tails
400
The Pequod meets the Rosebud
403
Ambergris
409
The Castaway
412
A Squeeze of the Hand
416
The Cassock
419
The TryWorks
421
The Lamp
425
Stowing Down Clearing Up
426
The Doubloon
428
The Pequod meets the Samuel Enderby of London
434
The Decanter
441
A Bower in the Arsacides
446
Measurement of the Whales Skeleton
450
The Fossil Whale
452
Does the Whale Diminish?
456
Ahabs Leg
460
The Carpenter
462
Ahab and the Carpenter
465
Ahab and Starbuck in the Cabin
469
Queequeg in his Coffin
471
The Pacific
477
The Blacksmith
478
The Forge
481
The Gilder
484
The Pequod meets the Bachelor
486
The Dying Whale
488
The Whale Watch
489
The Quadrant
491
The Candles
493
The Deck
500
Midnight Aloft
502
The Needle
505
The Log and Line
509
The LifeBuoy
512
The DeckAhab and the Carpenter
515
The Pequod meets the Rachel
517
The CabinAhab and Pip
521
The Hat
522
The Pequod meets the Delight
527
The Symphony
528
The ChaseFirst Day
532
The ChaseSecond Day
541
The ChaseThird Day
550
Epilogue
561
Literary Allusions and Notes
563
Herman Melville on MobyDick
585
Critical Excerpts
589
Suggestions for Further Reading
609
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Herman Melville was born in 1819 in New York City. After his father's death he left school for a series of clerical jobs before going to sea as a young man of nineteen. At twenty-one he shipped aboard the whaler Acushnet and began a series of adventures in the South Seas that would last for three years and form the basis for his first two novels, Typee and Omoo. Although these two novels sold well and gained for Melville a measure of fame, nineteenth-century readers were puzzled by the experiments with form that he began with his third novel, Mardi, and continued brilliantly in his masterpiece, Moby-Dick. During his later years spent working as a customs inspector on the New York docks, Melville published only poems, compiled in a collection entitled Battle-Pieces, and died in 1891 with Billy Budd, Sailor, now considered a classic, still unpublished.

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