A summary, historical and political, of the first planting, progressive improvements, and present state of the British settlements in North-America, Volume 2

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Dodsley, 1760 - 416 pages
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Page 483 - ... of our faid province for the time being, with the advice and confent of the council...
Page 167 - Transactions for 1741, referring to it as "an inscription in which are seven or eight lines, about seven or eight feet long, and about a foot wide, each of them engraven with unaccountable characters, not like any known character." In 1730, Dr. Isaac Greenwood, Hollisian Professor at Cambridge, New England, communicated to the Society of Antiquaries of London a drawing of the same inscription, accompanied with a description which proves the great care with...
Page 374 - York, his heirs and assigns, all that part of the main land of New England, beginning at a certain place called or known by the name of St. Croix, next adjoining to New Scotland in America...
Page 367 - Hyniouth in New England aforesaid, may be brought under such a form of government as may put them in a better condition of defence, and considering as well the granting unto them as unto our subjects in the said Colony of...
Page 418 - I say this: that if any come hither to plant for worldly ends that can live well at home, he commits an error, of which he will soon repent him.
Page 200 - ... express it, for a certain number of years, to reimburse the transporting charges, with some additional profit ; the others are criminals judicially transported, and their time of exile and servitude sold by certain undertakers and their agents. In our American settlements, generally the designations are, Province, where the King appoints a Governor ; Colony, where the freemen elect their own Governor : This customary acceptation is not universal ; Virginia is called a Colony, perhaps because...
Page 2 - are the common nuisance and disturbers of Europe, and will in a short time become the same in America, if not mutilated at home, and in America fenced off from us by ditches and walls, that is, by great rivers and impracticable mountains. . . . Their promises and faith are by them used only as a sort of scaffolding, which, when the structure is finished, or project effected, they drop. In all public treaties they are 'gens de mauvaise foi.
Page 551 - ... free from the payment of any quitrents or taxes, for the term of ten years ; at the expiration of which no...
Page 360 - Lately the long leases of the farmers in the north of Ireland being expired, the landlords raised their rents extravagantly. This occasioned an emigration of many north of Ireland Scotch...
Page 433 - ... has made men wind and twist and pull the text in all the several sects of Christians, I need not tell you. I design to take my religion from the Scripture, and then whether it suits, or suits not, any other denomination, I am not much concerned : for I think at the last day, it will not be inquired, whether I was of the Church of England or Geneva, but, whether I sought or embraced truth in the love of it.

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