The Teaching of Geography

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Scott, Foresman, 1909 - Geography - 292 pages
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Page 96 - Geography is a study of the earth as the home of man. Each important subject treated should contain a central idea illustrating this point. 2. The general movement is from the home outward to the home state, to the United States and North America, to Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and South America. 3. The home geography by means of excursions and very...
Page 56 - For instance, geography takes account of the solid crust f the earth. The solid crust of the earth is the special subject of three sciences, geology, mineralogy and palaeontology, which therefore diverge from geography as being specialized branches of the science which it presents in a general way. Then you have a second divergent branch in meteorology and oceanography, dealing with the phenomena of the air and vapor and the closely cognate phenomena of the great masses of condensed vapor which...
Page 57 - A fourth, a little more remote, consists of the sciences of physics and chemistry, which again deal with the constituents of the globe and of the forces which move them ; the forces which you see in operation on the Earth belong to the science of physics, and the study of the constituent elements of the Earth, the methods by •which they are analyzed, and the combinations which they form belong to the science of chemistry. Even astronomy, although it carries us beyond the limits of our terrestrial...
Page 233 - ... PHENOMENA OF CLIMATE. Information of a general character relating to the growth of plants will be of value in compiling the Climatology of a district. It is suggested that where voluntary observers can do so, the following be included in their records: Time of plowing in the spring. Time of planting various crops. Time of appearance of same above ground. Time of flowering of strawberries, currants, raspberries, apples, plums, and other fruit. Time of commencement of haying. Time of commencement...
Page 56 - ... ought to say, of the Earth as a part of and affected by other parts of the material universe, but in the first instance, and for our more immediate purpose, of the Earth which we inhabit. Geography is the science which takes for its province the describing to us everything that relates to the Earth. All branches of knowledge which have anything to tell us about the Earth more or less hinge into or are connected with geography, or you may, if you like, say they diverge from it as specialized departments...
Page 81 - Ritter's view. Everything that involves such a relationship is to that extent geographic. Anything in which such a relationship is wanting is to that extent not geographic. The location of a manufacturing village at a point where a stream affords water-power is an example of the kind of relation that is meant, and if this example is accepted, then the reasonable principle of continuity will guide us to include under geography every other example in which the way that organic forms have of doing things...
Page 56 - ... which exist on the surface of the Earth in the form of oceans. A third branch is that represented by the sciences of botany and zoology, describing the living creatures which find their home and their sustenance on the Earth. A fourth, a little more remote, consists of the sciences of physics and chemistry, which...
Page 57 - ... with the constituents of the globe and of the forces which move them ; the forces which you see in operation on the Earth belong to the science of physics, and the study of the constituent elements of the Earth, the methods by which they are analyzed, and the combinations which they form belong to the science of chemistry. Even astronomy, although it carries us beyond the limits of our terrestrial globe, is really closely connected with the science of the Earth inasmuch as many terrestrial phenomena...
Page 29 - ... and as gradually passed away; but there are few records of breaks in the geologic series, or of disturbances of any kind from the earliest appearance of life to the present time, that have resulted in the destruction of so many types as the cold of the Glacial epoch. CAUSES CONTROLLING DISTRIBUTION. It is now pretty generally conceded that temperature and humidity are the chief factors governing the distribution of life, and that temperature is more potent than humidity.
Page 81 - As a contribution toward this collection of opinions, let me state my own view: the essential in geography is a relation between the elements of terrestrial environment and the items of organic response; this being only a modernized extension of Ritter's view. Everything that involves such a relationship is to that extent geographic. Anything in which such a relationship is wanting is to that extent not geographic. The location of a manufacturing village at a point where a stream affords water-power...

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