Death's Little Helpers

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2006 - Fiction - 337 pages
4 Reviews
In this masterful follow-up to Peter Spiegelman’s stunning debutBlack Maps, private investigator John March finds himself drawn into a web of corruption that extends from the halls of high finance to the dark underworld of organized crime.

Gregory Danes, a Wall Street analyst has gone missing, and his ex-wife, a fashionable painter, calls March to track him down. She just wants him to sign her  alimony checks, but as March soon discovers, she’s not the only one looking for him. Danes was once an industry hot shot, but has  lost his touch. His biggest gains lately, it seems, had been in enemies–including a few members of the Russian mob. When March receives a threat upon his own family, he realizes Danes had been involved in something far more dangerous than insider trading.
 

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User Review  - pnorman4345 - LibraryThing

Noir detective story set in finance and New York city. Our detecitvie has cliched horrible things in past that drive him. The story is told in a straight forward way. and is well plotted. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mhanlon - LibraryThing

Not as good as Black Maps, which is one of my all-time favorites, but still an okay read. It was only after I'd begun reading it that I saw the blurb from Ken Bruen on the back, which should have ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
16
Section 3
32
Section 4
51
Section 5
63
Section 6
78
Section 7
93
Section 8
100
Section 17
241
Section 18
250
Section 19
257
Section 20
263
Section 21
276
Section 22
280
Section 23
285
Section 24
291

Section 9
109
Section 10
130
Section 11
145
Section 12
164
Section 13
174
Section 14
181
Section 15
192
Section 16
222
Section 25
299
Section 26
304
Section 27
309
Section 28
316
Section 29
323
Section 30
333
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Peter Spiegelman is the author of Black Maps. He worked on Wall Street for twenty years developing software systems for international banking institutions and retired in 2001 to devote himself to writing. He lives in Connecticut.

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