The history of the rebellion and civil wars in England to which is added an historical view of the affairs of Ireland. [on large paper, cm.24].

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1826
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Page 31 - GLORY be to GOD on high, and on earth peace, good-will towards men. We praise thee, we bless thee, we worship thee, we glorify thee, we give thanks to thee for thy great glory, O LORD GOD, heavenly King, GOD the Father Almighty.
Page 1 - For what nation is there so great, who hath God so nigh unto them, as the Lord our God is in all things that we call upon him for? and what nation is there so great, that hath statutes and judgments so righteous as all this law, which I set before you this day?
Page 444 - God, promise, vow and protest to maintain and defend, as far as lawfully I may, with my Life, Power and Estate the true Reformed Protestant Religion, expressed in the Doctrine of the Church of England, against all Popery and Popish Innovations within this Realm, contrary to the same Doctrine...
Page 104 - That he believed his Lord was at that time very merry, for he had now outlived the day, which his tutor Sandford had prognosticated upon his nativity he would not outlive ; but he had done it now, for that was his birth-day, which had completed his age to fifty years.' The next morning, by the time they came to Colebrook, they met with the news of his death.
Page 323 - Hampden was a man of much greater cunning, and it may be of the most discerning spirit, and of the greatest address and insinuation to bring any thing to pass which he desired, of any man of that time, and who laid the design deepest.
Page 343 - MR. SPECTATOR, — My Lord Clarendon has observed, that few men have done more harm than those who have been thought to be able to do least; and there cannot be a greater error, than to believe a man, whom we see qualified with too mean parts to do good, to be therefore incapable of doing hurt. There is a supply of malice, ot pride, of industry, and even of folly, in the weakest, when he sets his heart upon it, that makes a strange progress in mischief.
Page 183 - The words of his mouth were smoother than butter, but war was in his heart: his words were softer than oil, yet were they drawn swords.
Page 295 - Thou shalt not do so unto the LORD thy God: for every abomination to the LORD, which he hateth, have they done unto their gods; for even their sons and their daughters they have burnt in the fire to their gods.
Page 442 - Parliament, the lawful rights and liberties of the subjects, and every person that maketh the protestation, in whatsoever he shall do in the lawful pursuance of the same ; and to my power, and as far as lawfully I may, I will oppose, and by all good ways and means endeavour to bring to condign punishment...
Page 136 - ... the country full of pride, mutiny, and discontent ; every man more troubled and perplexed at that they called the violation of one law, than delighted or pleased with the observation of all the rest of the charter : never imputing the increase of their receipts, revenue, and plenty, to the wisdom, virtue, and merit of the crown, but objecting every little trivial imposition to the exorbitancy and tyranny of the government...

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