The Moral Philosopher: In a Dialogue Between Philalethes a Christian Deist, and Theophanes a Christian Jew. In which the Grounds and Reasons of Religion in General, and Particularly of Christianity, as Distinguish'd from the Religion of Nature with Many Other Matters of the Utmost Consequence in Religion, are Fairly Considered, and Debated, and the Arguments on Both Sides Impartially Represented

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author, 1738 - Apologetics - 450 pages
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Page 35 - Wherewith shall I come before the LORD, and bow myself before the high God ? shall I come before him with burnt offerings, with calves of a year old ? Will the LORD be pleased with thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil? shall I give my firstborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul...
Page 65 - Of whom I have no certain thing to write unto my lord. Wherefore I have brought him forth before you, and specially before thee, O king^ Agrippa, that, after examination had, I might have somewhat to write. 27 For it seemeth to me unreasonable to send a prisoner, and not withal to signify the crimes laid against him.
Page 261 - Therefore now let it please thee to bless the house of thy servant, that it may continue for ever before thee : for thou, O Lord GOD, hast spoken it: and with thy blessing let the house of thy servant be blessed for ever.
Page 160 - ... according to the deeds done in the body, whether they have been good, or whether they have been evil.
Page 29 - Mofes, were not to maintain any Peace or Amity with any other Nation or People, but on Condition of fubmitting to them as their Subjects, Slaves and Tributaries, under fuch Terms as they fhould think fit to impofe.
Page 213 - Chrift alfo hath once fuffered for fins, the juft for the unjuft, (that he might bring us to God...
Page 65 - King Agrippa, and all men which are here present with us, ye behold this man, about whom all the multitude of the Jews made suit to me, both at Jerusalem and here, crying that he ought not to live any longer. But I found that he had committed nothing worthy of death: and as he himself appealed to the emperor, I determined to send him.
Page 144 - That our Saviour's doctrines on these heads, though they appeared to be the true and genuine principles of nature and reason, when he had set them in a proper light, yet were such as the people had never heard or thought of before...
Page 366 - ... side, rather than flee before our enemies, or resign myself up to them. Prefer death to captivity; ever remember your unhappy brethren made prisoners at Fort Washington, whose blood now cries to Heaven for vengeance, and shakes the pillars of the world, saying, ' How long, O Lord, holy and true, dost thou not avenge our blood on them that dwell upon the earth ? ' Rather than quit this ground with infamy and disgrace.
Page 123 - Redemption thro' his Blood, even the Forgivenefs of Sins, according to the Riches of his Grace.

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