Elements of Ethics

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Stanford University Press, 2004 - Philosophy - 283 pages
This work renews the basic questions and principles of philosophical ethics and provides a thorough account of how being oneself presupposes freedom and responsibility. Elements of Ethics focuses on the descriptive and conceptual analysis of the experiences through which human lives become aware of themselves and shows how we are provoked to respond appropriately to the various dimensions and phenomena of the universe.

Operating on the provocative thesis that "if the ethical is real, it cannot be proved, because it is either nothing at all or an irreducible origin," this book pursues the question that defines ethics: "How should I live?" After setting out a preliminary definition of terms, Elements of Ethics gives insight into the relation of human individuals and the world by showing that the traditional separation between "is" and "ought" overlooks their profound coincidence, and by clarifying the determining, though often overlooked, role of affectivity and katharsis in all ethical experiences.

 

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Contents

Introduction I
1
From Doing to Living
22
Affections
56
Desire
73
Correspondence
98
The Analogy of Should
121
Unity and Universality
176
Freedom
186
Conscience
207
Adventures
233
Religion
252
Notes
263
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Adriaan T. Peperzak is Arthur J. Schmitt Professor in Philosophy at Loyola University, Chicago. He is the author or editor of over thirty books in five languages.

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